The Glassblowers by George SiposThe Glassblowers by George Sipos

The Glassblowers

byGeorge Sipos

Paperback | February 12, 2010

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George Sipos hears the frog song at two in the morning and wonders if it is passion that drives it or the loneliness of spring. In another poem, the wet leaves of fall are described in language that cuts two ways: "I work the rake, &#47 you the wheelbarrow. when we get tired we will change."

With quiet humour, he writes of nature, the land, and the tasks of an ordinary day. Alive with sublety, The Glassblowers quietly turns images and metaphors the way we might turn a small stone between our thumb and fingers to see its facets and colours.

Born in Budapest and raised in London, Ontario, George Sipos spent over a decade as a teacher in Prince George, British Columbia. For many years, he ran Mosquito Books, a store where poets always felt at home. Sipos now manages the Prince George Symphony Orchestra.
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Title:The GlassblowersFormat:PaperbackDimensions:104 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.3 inPublished:February 12, 2010Publisher:GOOSE LANE EDITIONSLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0864925409

ISBN - 13:9780864925404

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George Sipos hears the frog song at two in the morning and wonders if it is passion that drives it or the loneliness of spring. In another poem, the wet leaves of fall are described in language that cuts two ways: "I work the rake, / you the wheelbarrow. when we get tired we will change." With quiet humour, he writes of nature, the land, and the tasks of an ordinary day. Alive with sublety, The Glassblowers quietly turns images and metaphors the way we might turn a small stone between our thumb and fingers to see its facets and colours."The essence of Sipos's work is its honouring of evanescence, its surprising alloy of grief and gratitude, its light hand, its astute eye." — Jan Zwicky, The Globe and Mail