The Golden Door: Italian and Jewish Immigrant Mobility in New York City

Paperback | March 1, 1989

byThomas Kessner

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For the past two decades American scholars have been engaged in an intense examination of social mobility in American life. At the profoundest level, these studies examine the general notion that American society has been historically an open system which offered great opportunity for advancement to its poor and newcomers.

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From Our Editors

For the past two decades American scholars have been engaged in an intense examination of social mobility in American life. At the profoundest level, these studies examine the general notion that American society has been historically an open system which offered great opportunity for advancement to its poor and newcomers.

From the Publisher

For the past two decades American scholars have been engaged in an intense examination of social mobility in American life. At the profoundest level, these studies examine the general notion that American society has been historically an open system which offered great opportunity for advancement to its poor and newcomers.

Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 5.31 × 7.99 × 0.51 inPublished:March 1, 1989Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195021614

ISBN - 13:9780195021615

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From Our Editors

For the past two decades American scholars have been engaged in an intense examination of social mobility in American life. At the profoundest level, these studies examine the general notion that American society has been historically an open system which offered great opportunity for advancement to its poor and newcomers.

Editorial Reviews

"The Golden Door...is an admirable and daring work....Professor Kessner has suceeded in blending the best of all possible worlds; he has merged quantitative data with literary and sociological sources to produce a synthetic work of high quality....a major contribution to both quantitative andcomparative ethnic history. It is a pioneering study, and should serve as [a] guide...for future research."--Caroline Golab, Journal of European Economic History