The Good Soldier by Ford Madox FordThe Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

The Good Soldier

byFord Madox Ford

Paperback | November 2, 2011

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From one of the 20th century's major writers — a story of deception and betrayal, of conventional appearances and bitter truth. Highly innovative for its time, this powerful novel tells of 2 married couples whose long, ongoing friendship is severely disrupted when one husband learns that his wife has been the mistress of his British friend.

About The Author

Born Ford Hermann Madox Hueffer in England in 1873, Ford Madox Ford came from a family of artists and writers that included his grandfather, the pre-Raphaelite painter Ford Madox Brown, and his uncles Gabriel Dante Rossetti and William Michael Rossetti. Ford's early works were published under the name Ford Madox Hueffer, but in 1919 he...
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Details & Specs

Title:The Good SoldierFormat:PaperbackPublished:November 2, 2011Publisher:Dover PublicationsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0486419215

ISBN - 13:9780486419213

Appropriate for ages: 14

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Customer Reviews of The Good Soldier

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Classic This is such a great book, one of the greatest in our language.
Date published: 2017-01-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome This is one of the best novels I have ever read
Date published: 2017-01-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Saddest story ever written This really is the saddest story ever written, John Dowell (the narrator) is telling us the story of his wife's affair many years after it happened, and so we're reading about all the things that John just didn't see. It's really sad to see all these characters fumbling around, missing all the signs, and then looking back on it. While it's a good story, the writing is a little slow at some parts, and really boring at others. But the story makes you want to keep reading. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Saddest story ever written This really is the saddest story ever written, John Dowell (the narrator) is telling us the story of his wife's affair many years after it happened, and so we're reading about all the things that John just didn't see. It's really sad to see all these characters fumbling around, missing all the signs, and then looking back on it. While it's a good story, the writing is a little slow at some parts, and really boring at others. But the story makes you want to keep reading. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Characters You Love to Hate Some of you may have read this book in college or university--and hated it. There is a good reason to hate it. I did the first time I read it. Well, not exactly HATE, but I didn't really like it. But this is a book you have to read twice to actually like. It sounds strange, but it's very true. The reason for this is that the novel has a mixed chronology, going back and forth in time without giving much warning, which can confuse the reader. More so, it's because of the narrator, John Dowell, one of the greatest, most complex, and most annoying of all literary characters. Is he the stupid, ignorant, innocent husband? Or is he really a jerk? There are so many questions this book leaves you with that it's mindboggling (In a very good way). The reason to read this book twice is because Dowell has the tendency to reveal great secrets and importants bits of information at the most inappropriate moments. He keeps jumping around: Ford wanted to imitate the way the mind thinks, which jumps around, by making Dowell talk about something, then say he left a sentence unfinished some pages ago, then going back to it--it's brilliant. And when you read the second time through, the book makes so much sense that you will be AMAZED. It's like a lightbulb goes off in your head and you're staggered by the sheer amounts of things you missed the first time. Believe me, read it once (hate it or love it) then read it again. I know there's not much incentive to read it twice if you hated it the first time but you'll be surprised at how good it is. Anyways, Ford has great wit, like in the way he shows through such subtle ways each of the characters (or what he doesn't show). What is most interesting is that this book takes place in the years leading up to WW1, and the narrator (Dowell), is actually writing this as the War's going on. But he NEVER mentions the war. The way Ford does this is brilliant, really. The book is totally centered on its characters, which you can love or hate. Believe me--read it!
Date published: 2004-12-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from This is the saddest story I've ever heard... This is the saddest story I've ever heard... says John Dowell, the narrator of the story, which takes place in the early 20th century. John's wife has been cheating on him for nine years with Edward Ashburnham, a supposed Good Soldier . I am not ruining the story by telling you this. John will explain this at the beginning and at the end you will be suprised by how much seemingly shallow fictional characters will touch you. Once you put the book down you will realize that this is infact the saddest story you've ever heard. All were wealthy, but without love. They were quietly miserable and lonely.
Date published: 2002-06-25