The Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth-Century British Writing: GRAMMAR OF EMPIRE IN 18TH-CENT by Janet SorensenThe Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth-Century British Writing: GRAMMAR OF EMPIRE IN 18TH-CENT by Janet Sorensen

The Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth-Century British Writing: GRAMMAR OF EMPIRE IN 18TH-CENT

byJanet Sorensen

Paperback | November 3, 2005

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This study explores the complex role of language as an instrument of empire in eighteenth-century British literature. Focusing on the relationship between England and one of its "Celtic colonies," Scotland, Janet Sorensen examines how the expansion of the British empire influenced the formation of a national standard English. The book demonstrates the ambivalence at the heart of British linguistic identity, moving from a close analysis of Scottish writers Alexander MacDonald, Adam Smith, Hugh Blair, and Tobias Smollett to a revised understanding of the language use of Samuel Johnson and Jane Austen.
Title:The Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth-Century British Writing: GRAMMAR OF EMPIRE IN 18TH-CENTFormat:PaperbackDimensions:332 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:November 3, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021553

ISBN - 13:9780521021555

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Scripting identity?: English language and literacy instruction in the Highlands and the strange case of Alexander MacDonald; 2. 'A grammarians regard to the genius of our tongue': Johnson's Dictionary, imperial grammar and the customary national language; 3. Women, Celts and hollow voices: Tobias Smollett's brokering of Anglo-British linguistic identities; 4. The figure of the nation: polite language and its originary other in Adam Smith's and Hugh Blair's Lectures in Rhetoric and Belles Lettres; 5. 'A translator without originals': William Shaw's Scots Gaelic and the dialectic of (linguistic) empire; Epilogue: Jane Austen's language and the strangeness at home in the center.

Editorial Reviews

"The Grammar of Empire is well positioned to generate discussion in the years to come." Albion