The Grammar of the Unconscious: The Conceptual Foundations of Psychoanalysis

Paperback | May 10, 2005

byCharles Elder

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The Grammar of the Unconscious is both an inquiry into certain long-standing conceptual problems and the exemplification of Wittgenstein's grammatical method. The problems are for the most part those that surround the question of the status of psychoanalysis as a theory of symbolism, psychosexual development, and culture. Using the method of grammatical analysis, Elder clarifies the distinctive features and conditions of the language of psychoanalysis—conceptual, logical, and grammatical—thus showing both the validity and the limits of its truth.

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The Grammar of the Unconscious is both an inquiry into certain long-standing conceptual problems and the exemplification of Wittgenstein's grammatical method. The problems are for the most part those that surround the question of the status of psychoanalysis as a theory of symbolism, psychosexual development, and culture. Using the met...

Charles R. Elder is a William Rainey Harper Fellow and teaches in the social science collegiate division of the University of Chicago.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.61 inPublished:May 10, 2005Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271025670

ISBN - 13:9780271025674

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“The Grammar of the Unconscious reads and queries Freud’s understanding of psychical reality using Wittgensteinian ‘grammatical analysis.’ I am convinced that this use provides original and important critiques of Freud’s scientific self-understanding and of influential misreadings of Freud. As it does so, it exemplifies grammatical analysis in lively, moving, and clear language. The reader is invited to think with the author, who becomes a conceptually rigorous, meditative, lyrical, amusing, and honest guide, through the different uses of foundational psychoanalytical terms. In my judgment, this study should define the terms in which the status of Freudian theory is henceforth discussed.”—Judith Van Herik, Pennsylvania State University