The Great Design: Particles, Fields, and Creation

Paperback | June 1, 1994

byRobert K. Adair

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Although modern physics surrounds us, and newspapers constantly refer to its concepts, most nonscientists find the subject extremely intimidating. Complicated mathematics or gross oversimplifications written by laypersons obscure most attempts to explain physics to general readers. Now, at long last, we have a comprehensive--and comprehensible--account of particles, fields, and cosmology, written by a working physicist who does not burden the reader with the weight of ponderous scientific notation. Exploring how physicists think about problems, Robert K. Adair considersthe assumptions they make in order to simplify impossibly complex relationships between objects, how they determine on what scale to treat the problem, how they make measurements, and the interplay between theory and experiment. Adair gently guides the reader through the ideas of particles, fields, relativity, and quantum mechanics. He explains the great discoveries of this century--which have caused a revolution in how we view the universe--in simple, logical terms, comprehensible with a knowledge of high schoolalgebra. Performing the difficult task of predigesting complex concepts, Adair gives nonscientists access to what often appears to be an arcane discipline, and captures the joy of discovery which lies at the heart of research.

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From Our Editors

Now, at long last, we have a comprehensive - and comprehensible - account of particles, fields, and cosmology, written by a working physicist who does not burden the reader with the weight of ponderous scientific notation. Performing the difficult task of predigesting complex concepts, Robert K. Adair gives non scientists access to wha...

From the Publisher

Although modern physics surrounds us, and newspapers constantly refer to its concepts, most nonscientists find the subject extremely intimidating. Complicated mathematics or gross oversimplifications written by laypersons obscure most attempts to explain physics to general readers. Now, at long last, we have a comprehensive--...

From the Jacket

Now, at long last, we have a comprehensive - and comprehensible - account of particles, fields, and cosmology, written by a working physicist who does not burden the reader with the weight of ponderous scientific notation. Performing the difficult task of predigesting complex concepts, Robert K. Adair gives non scientists access to wha...

Robert K. Adair is Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics at Yale University. He is the author of Concepts in Physics and (with Earle C. Fowler) Strange Particles.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:384 pages, 9.17 × 6.14 × 0.98 inPublished:June 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195060695

ISBN - 13:9780195060690

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Customer Reviews of The Great Design: Particles, Fields, and Creation

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Excellent Overview If you're looking for an overview of *all* of physics up the the present time of the writing, you've found it. Though at times a little overzelous in its explanations, Adair's attention to all facets of physics is certainly a plus. Very Good.
Date published: 1999-05-09

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From Our Editors

Now, at long last, we have a comprehensive - and comprehensible - account of particles, fields, and cosmology, written by a working physicist who does not burden the reader with the weight of ponderous scientific notation. Performing the difficult task of predigesting complex concepts, Robert K. Adair gives non scientists access to what often appears to be an arcane discipline, and captures the joy of discovery which lies at the heart of research.

Editorial Reviews

"This is a clean, readable account of contemporary thought by physicists. I have recommended it to our physics majors as a cultural undertaking."--Albert C. Claus, Loyola University