The Great Game of Genocide: Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians

Paperback | July 31, 2007

byDonald Bloxham

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The Great Game of Genocide addresses the origins, development and aftermath of the Armenian genocide in a wide-ranging reappraisal based on primary and secondary sources from all the major parties involved. Rejecting the determinism of many influential studies, and discarding polemics on allsides, it founds its interpretation of the genocide in the interaction between the Ottoman empire in its decades of terminal decline, the self-interested policies of the European imperial powers, and the agenda of some Armenian nationalists in and beyond Ottoman territory. Particular attention ispaid to the international context of the process of ethnic polarization that culminated in the massive destruction of 1912-23, and especially the obliteration of the Armenian community in 1915-16. The opening chapters of the book examine the relationship between the great power politics of the 'eastern question' from 1774, the narrower politics of the 'Armenian question' from the mid-nineteenth century, and the internal Ottoman questions of reforming the complex social and ethnic order underintense external pressure. Later chapters include detailed case studies of the role of Imperial Germany during the First World War (reaching conclusions markedly different to the prevailing orthodoxy of German complicity in the genocide); the wartime Entente and then the uncomfortable postwarAnglo-French axis; and American political interest in the Middle East in the interwar period which led to a policy of refusing to recognize the genocide. The book concludes by explaining the ongoing international denial of the genocide as an extension of the historical 'Armenian question', with manyof the same considerations governing modern European-American-Turkish interaction as existed prior to the First World War.

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The Great Game of Genocide addresses the origins, development and aftermath of the Armenian genocide in a wide-ranging reappraisal based on primary and secondary sources from all the major parties involved. Rejecting the determinism of many influential studies, and discarding polemics on allsides, it founds its interpretation of the ge...

Donald Bloxham is a Reader in History, University of Edinburgh.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:344 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.71 inPublished:July 31, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199226881

ISBN - 13:9780199226887

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Genocide and the Armenian CasePart I: Mass Murder in an International System1. Prologue: Eastern Questions, Nationalist Answers2. Ethnic Reprisal and Ethnic CleansingChapter Interlude The Genocide in ContextInternational Response and Responsibility in the Genocide Era3. Imperial Germany: A Case of Mistaken Identity4. Ethnic Violence and the Entente 1915-235. New Minority Questions in the New Near EastPart III: From Response to Recognition?6. The USA: From Non-Intervention to Non-RecognitionEpilogue: the geopolitics of memory

Editorial Reviews

`a very important book... a comprehensive and complex explanation based on serious scholarship. It is not for those who want easy answers and facile assignments of blame.' Modern Greek Studies