The Great Gatsby

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The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Editor Ruth Prigozy

Oxford University Press | July 12, 2008 | Trade Paperback

The Great Gatsby is rated 4.2308 out of 5 by 26.
"He talked a lot about the past and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy. His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if he could once return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was . . ." The Great Gatsby (1925), F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece, stands among the greatest of all American fiction. Jay Gatsby's lavish lifestyle in a mansion on Long Island's gold coast encapsulates the spirit, excitement, and violence of the era Fitzgerald named `the Jazz Age'. Impelled by his love for Daisy Buchanan, Gatsby seeks nothing less than to recapture the moment five years earlier when his best and brightest dreams - his `unutterable visions' - seemed to be incarnated in her kiss. A moving portrayal of the power of romantic imagination, as well as the pathos and courage entailed in the pusuit of an unattainable dream, The Great Gatsby is a classic fiction of hope and disillusion. This edition is fully annotated with a fine Introduction incorporating new interpretation and detailing Fitzgerald's struggle to write the novel, its critical reception and its significance for future generations.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 208 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 0.35 in

Published: July 12, 2008

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0199536406

ISBN - 13: 9780199536405

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great story I divided to read the book before the movie came out. Really enjoyed it. Fast read and a great story. Some definite life lessons to be learned.
Date published: 2015-10-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Felt as though I was there Illustrates well the scenery, and you get a true sense of how it feels to be in a room with the characters.
Date published: 2015-02-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wonderful I finally re-read this classic tale of love, excess, melancholy and the American Dream. The writing is beautiful, refined and elegant. The story is enfolding and gripping. I think the tale of Jay Gatsby’s climb up the social echelon to attempt to finally love Daisy in reality, rather than dreams, just gets better with age.
Date published: 2014-11-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful! Book 10 of 15: F. Scott Fitzgerald's prose is beautiful! That alone had me hooked and I powered through 7 out of 9 chapters in one sitting! I almost regret not having read it sooner... the book deserves, every bit, the 'Great American Novel' title! There are certain books I've read in my lifetime I wish I could re-read, without any prior memory, and re-experience the magic: the Harry Potter series, The Alchemist and The Book Thief to name a few... Gatsby is definitely going on that list! Too bad the ending was revealed to me in another book, before I could read it in the final chapters of The Great Gatsby; didn't make it any less heartbreaking though. #readingchallenge2014
Date published: 2014-10-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Gatsby Loved it....looking forward to the movie!
Date published: 2014-03-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Felt as though I was there I really enjoyed this book. It was an easy read, and I enjoyed the authors writing style.
Date published: 2014-01-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Gatsby I thought long and hard about what I wanted to say in regards to The Great Gatsby. When I closed the book last night, I knew that it had reserved a spot in my top five favorite books of all time, I just didn't understand why. When I compared it to what I consider to be my favorite book, The Stand, I couldn't put together a reason as to why it can stand on equal footing (no pun intended). The Stand is about 10 Gatsby's in length and is so thick with plot and sheer amount of characters that sticking it on the same proverbial shelf with such a smaller and much more simple book is mind boggling. Sure, it has a massive amount of critical praise and is widely considering one of the greatest American novels of all time but why? On it's surface, the story about a charismatic and mysterious millionaire didn't appear to be anything original. It also didn't help that almost nothing happens within the first 50 pages. However, both of those points did nothing to explain why I couldn't put it down. I thought about it for a while and decided that I'm simply going to have to blame Fitzgerald's writing. Anyone can write about parties, career choices and conversations over tea but to do it in a way that makes it hard to look away is wholly impressive. There were passages that I had to re-read and then re-re-read. The opener of this review may be one of my all time favorite quotes. Then again, I could always blame his characters. Nick Carraway is an every man that you can easily identify with. As he explains the grandeur and majesty of Gatsby's parties, the caliber of guests it draws and the overall atmosphere of a post-war America; he does so in a way that leaves you longing to visit the era yet refusing to oversell it. How in the world can someone do that? It's not as easy as telling someone about how historic an event is and following it up with, "Yeah.. it was OK, I guess." I could also throw blame in the direction of that scene in the Plaza Hotel. I'm not going to give anything away (and honestly, I don't think I could as I may be the last person to read this book) but the tension in that room was like nothing I've ever read. I almost couldn't deal with the awkward vibe that Fitzgerald projected here, especially when you consider the headstrong self-righteousness that Gatsby bases his whole existence on. Look, this is a great book and certainly a classic. I doubt I brought anything new to the table here with my thoughts but I think if you ever have any reservations about reading this, you should toss them right out the window. I have been consistently prodded to read this book over the last year and for whatever reason, it constantly moved down on my to-read list. What an error on my part!
Date published: 2013-10-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! Can't wait to see the movie!
Date published: 2013-08-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from In love with Jay Gatsby @ the moment Gatsby's entire life was devoted to the faint hope of rekindling his old love affair with Daisy. He was a victim of unrequited love. Daisy just didn't reciprocate the way Gatsby expected or deserved for that matter. "Great Gatsby" ... in my eyes A " Gentle Giant" The book just brings u through a different journey with Gatsby. Loved it.
Date published: 2013-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Gatsby I saw the movie before reading the book. Glad I did it in that order because I would have been disappointed in the movie.
Date published: 2013-06-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Gatsby Kept me up all night. Definitely a lot more romantic than I expected. An easy read filled with twists and turns and a lot left for the reader to analyze for themselves; perhaps this is what makes it a classic. Very easy to imagine and picture as a non fiction tale because it encompasses a plethora of natural flaws that humans are born with or tempted into. I could go on...But the sheer amount of poetic, memorable quotes, all summed up in such a light read, are definitely worth a glace, even for the busiest of people.
Date published: 2013-05-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome book Glad I read it before the movie came out. Such an unexpected end.
Date published: 2013-04-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Simply lovely. Beautifully written and reflective of it's time period. Gatsby is a complex and mysterious character--the best kind!
Date published: 2013-04-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A school book becoming a favourite. In my grade 11 high school English class we had to read this book and write an essay on it. Normally I don't read books, so starting to read this one was a challenge. At first, I thought the book was a little dry and confusing. All the symbolism within the book made me think too much and made me not enjoy the story. After that assignment, I decided to give this book another try. Now without the pressure of school, I was able to enjoy the book more and it has become one of my favourites. Even though I know nothing about the American Dream, this book put me in the place of Gatsby's shoes and brought me into his mindset. I wonder if the American Dream is the same for every American as it was for Gatsby.
Date published: 2012-02-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth reading again I first read this novel in the 10th grade, and hated it. I decided to pick up again 10 years later and am glad I did as I thoroughly enjoyed it the second time through. Fitzgerald's 1920's suburban landscape really comes to life throughout the novel, so much so that I wish it was longer than the 100-odd pages in order to spend more time getting to know the intriguing characters - especially the enigmatic Gatsby. This Wordsworth edition has a great introuduction by Guy Reynolds which enlightens the reader about the contemporary atmosphere that Fitzgerald creates - a world full of cars, telephones and other such technology that was just becoming commonplace at the time of the publication. This edition also includes many footnotes by the editors, which while often banal did come in handy in identifying many early pop culture references.
Date published: 2008-12-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intellectually Stimulating! The life of Jay Gatsby is facinating in itself that he depicts the ideal American dream that many of us strives for. Fitzgerald is brilliant in depicting the ideal and intellectually critiques American lifestyles, and our need to be sucessful as a cult. Although it was a hard read for a beginner, once you read deeper into the meaning and the symbolism, you enter into a world of facination for Jay Gatsby; and the lifestyle he chooses in order to achieve the ultimate success (Diasy). What the story tells us, is that although the American dream is idealized as something that can be achieved in a liberal society by everyone and anyone through hard work, the reality is, not every one can attain it- success is abstract and socially constructed so that only certain people can have it. Fitzgerald writes brilliantly in ways that uses the system of metaphors to help us understand Jay Gastby, and in turn. understand something about ourselves. Highly recommended!
Date published: 2008-04-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Symbolic meaning Gatsby is a great novel. I really enjoyed this one in school and found myself reading ahead of the assigned chapters. I found the most interesting part of this book was the symbolism throughout the whole thing. Fitzgerald takes the time to actually discribe the colors of their outfits and the movement of the characters. Even now I find myself picking up great classics such as this one to read for my own leasure as an adult.
Date published: 2008-01-14
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A chore to read Perhaps it is because I am from a far younger generation, but I found the story to be extremely dull (I couldn't even sit through the movie), and the the quality of the actual writing to be sub-par.
Date published: 2007-12-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Gatsby is the true definition of the romantic (and tragic) hero which is what makes this novel so intriguing. The hope he has to be with Daisy gives him the fierce determination needed to get him what he wants. But like Hamlet, he is corrupted by the world which surrounds him, turning this inspiring characteristic into a flaw. As Fitzgerald's most famous novel, "The Great Gatsby" is heralded by critics and perfect for any idealist.
Date published: 2006-07-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dramatic story-telling at its finest The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, a great novel and another one of my favourites. Its story is dramatic, sutle and in the end, heartbreaking. The novel tells us about a rich man named Gatsby, not cut out for the life of riches and fame, who throws parties constantly to see if he can meet his old love again. The theme shows us the troubles of the rich and famous and that is anybody when you are rich ever your friend? When you die, will anybody care? A tale that sticks with you and saddens you. First rate novel.
Date published: 2005-12-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent work, great read A startling and eye opening portrayal of not only life in the 1920s, but of love, compassion and human nature. I chose this book for my English 30-1 novel study and I fell in love with this book. The vivid details, the drama, the tragedy that unfolds at the end... This is writing at its best!
Date published: 2005-05-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fitzgerald's Masterpiece Some readers say that the book fails to show us life in the Roaring 20's; that was never its claim. It never said what the 20's were supposed to be like; it's just when the novel takes place simply to establish the character of Jay Gatsby and his rise to fame. Actually it does have a lot on the 20's, you just have to be perceptive; those were the years of bootlegging and high-crime, and that's how Gatsby establishes himself. It also never claims to leave readers with a revelation on the meaning of life or love or ANY such thing as that. Is there a plot? Yes, but the plot is not important. This is a character-driven story, as were most Modernist pieces, for they strove to show the experiences of the regular people. Please keep in mind that this book doesn't try to teach us anything except for what we seem to take away from it in our own opinion. If you have this version of the novel then look at the first sentence of the preface. Now, as for my opinion on why this is a masterpiece, there is one reason above all others: it is very readable. The Great Gatsby may not seduce me with its intricate devices, but the characters hold me in reading limbo. They are fantastically developed, such as Nick and his obsession for Gatsby, or Gatsby himself, who does so much for the love of Daisy. Daisy and Tom irritate me with their selfish ways, thinking they can ruin the lives of the poor simply because they're rich. This book is readable because of its characters and its smooth, easy to read langauge. It is a masterpiece in all respects.
Date published: 2004-07-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from ITS DAMN GREAT no one knows what they are talking about. he is not a failed author, rather this american classic is just overrated and they come in expecting this great masterpiece and unfulfillable desires that cannot be met in reality. the book while does not acclaim to any spectacular or different context and resembles pioneer soap operas it is a incredible book to study and see beneath the underlying surfaces such as symbolism and other devices used that cannot be matched with just any other literary piece.
Date published: 2003-09-27
Rated 2 out of 5 by from What's So Great About It? The Great Gatsby is, quite frankly, a failed work on Fitzgerald's behalf. The characters are under-developed, and what little there is to know of them is detestable, the so-called creative symbolism doesn't take a Rhodes Scholar to figure out, and there is little insight into the Roaring '20's era which so few can relate to. Any tolerable aspects of this book are ruined by the fact that it is forced upon us in high school. Also, avoid the film versions if you can - they are equally painful!
Date published: 2003-04-07
Rated 2 out of 5 by from The not-so-great-Gatsby This "american classic" failed to interest me despite its acclaim. I read this book years after having finishing high-school, despite the fact that in many english courses, it is required reading. I found the novel to be uninspiring, and it failed to capture my attention. Although seen as a contemporary classic, the audience will have a hard time relating to main characters that embody the life-style of the elite. The length of this novel hindered this reader the ability to identify with the characters, however, its berevity ended my dissatisfaction before I could invest too much of my interest. Please, ONLY read this book when forced to by the school board.
Date published: 2000-01-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Gatsby This novella is perfect for those who want to read the classics but don't like long stories. It is set in the infamous Jazz Age of the roaring twenties and Fitzgerald perfectly captures the qualities of this era. He writes from experience with great insight. As well as being a love story, it is a commentary on human nature and American society. You will like some characters and dislike others; the elusive Gatsby will keep you guessing.
Date published: 1999-01-11

– More About This Product –

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Editor Ruth Prigozy

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 208 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 0.35 in

Published: July 12, 2008

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0199536406

ISBN - 13: 9780199536405

From the Publisher

"He talked a lot about the past and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy. His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if he could once return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was . . ." The Great Gatsby (1925), F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece, stands among the greatest of all American fiction. Jay Gatsby's lavish lifestyle in a mansion on Long Island's gold coast encapsulates the spirit, excitement, and violence of the era Fitzgerald named `the Jazz Age'. Impelled by his love for Daisy Buchanan, Gatsby seeks nothing less than to recapture the moment five years earlier when his best and brightest dreams - his `unutterable visions' - seemed to be incarnated in her kiss. A moving portrayal of the power of romantic imagination, as well as the pathos and courage entailed in the pusuit of an unattainable dream, The Great Gatsby is a classic fiction of hope and disillusion. This edition is fully annotated with a fine Introduction incorporating new interpretation and detailing Fitzgerald's struggle to write the novel, its critical reception and its significance for future generations.

About the Author

Ruth Prigozy is Professor and former Chair of English at Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York. She has edited Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise and is co-editor of the F.Scott Fitzgerald Newsletter.