The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Scribner | June 1, 1996 | Hardcover

The Great Gatsby is rated 4.4 out of 5 by 20.
The exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, F. Scott Fitzgeralds' third book, The Great Gatsby (1925), stands as the supreme achievement of his career. T. S. Eliot read it three times and saw it as the "first step" American fiction had taken since Henry James; H. L. Mencken praised "the charm and beauty of the writing," as well as Fitzgerald's sharp social sense; and Thomas Wolfe hailed it as Fitzgerald's "best work" thus far. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when, The New York Times remarked, "gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession," it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth. A novel of lyrical beauty yet brutal realism, of magic, romance, and mysticism, The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.
This is the definitive, textually accurate edition of The Great Gatsby, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli and authorized by the estate of F. Scott Fitzgerald. The first edition of The Great Gatsby contained many errors resulting from Fitzgerald's extensive revisions and a rushed production schedule, and subsequent editions introduced further departures from the author's intentions. This critical edition draws on the manuscript and surviving proofs of the novel, along with Fitzgerald's later revisions and corrections, to restore the text to its original form. It is The Great Gatsby as Fitzgerald intended it.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.7 in

Published: June 1, 1996

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0684830426

ISBN - 13: 9780684830421

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A school book becoming a favourite. In my grade 11 high school English class we had to read this book and write an essay on it. Normally I don't read books, so starting to read this one was a challenge. At first, I thought the book was a little dry and confusing. All the symbolism within the book made me think too much and made me not enjoy the story. After that assignment, I decided to give this book another try. Now without the pressure of school, I was able to enjoy the book more and it has become one of my favourites. Even though I know nothing about the American Dream, this book put me in the place of Gatsby's shoes and brought me into his mindset. I wonder if the American Dream is the same for every American as it was for Gatsby.
Date published: 2012-02-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intellectually Stimulating! The life of Jay Gatsby is facinating in itself that he depicts the ideal American dream that many of us strives for. Fitzgerald is brilliant in depicting the ideal and intellectually critiques American lifestyles, and our need to be sucessful as a cult. Although it was a hard read for a beginner, once you read deeper into the meaning and the symbolism, you enter into a world of facination for Jay Gatsby; and the lifestyle he chooses in order to achieve the ultimate success (Diasy). What the story tells us, is that although the American dream is idealized as something that can be achieved in a liberal society by everyone and anyone through hard work, the reality is, not every one can attain it- success is abstract and socially constructed so that only certain people can have it. Fitzgerald writes brilliantly in ways that uses the system of metaphors to help us understand Jay Gastby, and in turn. understand something about ourselves. Highly recommended!
Date published: 2008-04-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Symbolic meaning Gatsby is a great novel. I really enjoyed this one in school and found myself reading ahead of the assigned chapters. I found the most interesting part of this book was the symbolism throughout the whole thing. Fitzgerald takes the time to actually discribe the colors of their outfits and the movement of the characters. Even now I find myself picking up great classics such as this one to read for my own leasure as an adult.
Date published: 2008-01-14
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A chore to read Perhaps it is because I am from a far younger generation, but I found the story to be extremely dull (I couldn't even sit through the movie), and the the quality of the actual writing to be sub-par.
Date published: 2007-12-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Gatsby is the true definition of the romantic (and tragic) hero which is what makes this novel so intriguing. The hope he has to be with Daisy gives him the fierce determination needed to get him what he wants. But like Hamlet, he is corrupted by the world which surrounds him, turning this inspiring characteristic into a flaw. As Fitzgerald's most famous novel, "The Great Gatsby" is heralded by critics and perfect for any idealist.
Date published: 2006-07-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dramatic story-telling at its finest The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, a great novel and another one of my favourites. Its story is dramatic, sutle and in the end, heartbreaking. The novel tells us about a rich man named Gatsby, not cut out for the life of riches and fame, who throws parties constantly to see if he can meet his old love again. The theme shows us the troubles of the rich and famous and that is anybody when you are rich ever your friend? When you die, will anybody care? A tale that sticks with you and saddens you. First rate novel.
Date published: 2005-12-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent work, great read A startling and eye opening portrayal of not only life in the 1920s, but of love, compassion and human nature. I chose this book for my English 30-1 novel study and I fell in love with this book. The vivid details, the drama, the tragedy that unfolds at the end... This is writing at its best!
Date published: 2005-05-17

– More About This Product –

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.7 in

Published: June 1, 1996

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0684830426

ISBN - 13: 9780684830421

Read from the Book

CHAPTER I In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since. “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.” He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought—frequently I have feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for theintimate revelations of young men, or at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth. And, after boasting this way of my tolera
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From the Publisher

The exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, F. Scott Fitzgeralds' third book, The Great Gatsby (1925), stands as the supreme achievement of his career. T. S. Eliot read it three times and saw it as the "first step" American fiction had taken since Henry James; H. L. Mencken praised "the charm and beauty of the writing," as well as Fitzgerald's sharp social sense; and Thomas Wolfe hailed it as Fitzgerald's "best work" thus far. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when, The New York Times remarked, "gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession," it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth. A novel of lyrical beauty yet brutal realism, of magic, romance, and mysticism, The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.
This is the definitive, textually accurate edition of The Great Gatsby, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli and authorized by the estate of F. Scott Fitzgerald. The first edition of The Great Gatsby contained many errors resulting from Fitzgerald's extensive revisions and a rushed production schedule, and subsequent editions introduced further departures from the author's intentions. This critical edition draws on the manuscript and surviving proofs of the novel, along with Fitzgerald's later revisions and corrections, to restore the text to its original form. It is The Great Gatsby as Fitzgerald intended it.

About the Author

F. Scott Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1896, attended Princeton University, and published his first novel, This Side of Paradise, in 1920. That same year he married Zelda Sayre and the couple divided their time between New York, Paris, and the Riviera, becoming a part of the American expatriate circle that included Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and John Dos Passos. Fitzgerald was hailed early on as a major new voice in American fiction; his other novels include The Beautiful and Damned and Tender Is the Night. He died of a heart attack in 1940 at the age of forty-four, while working on The Love of the Last Tycoon.

From Our Editors

The authorized text which restores all the language of Fitzgerald's 1920's classic story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan.

Editorial Reviews

James Dickey Now we have an American masterpiece in its final form: the original crystal has shaped itself into the true diamond. This is the novel as Fitzgerald wished it to be, and so it is what we have dreamed of, sleeping and waking