The Great Migration: Journey to the North by Eloise GreenfieldThe Great Migration: Journey to the North by Eloise Greenfield

The Great Migration: Journey to the North

byEloise Greenfield

Hardcover | December 21, 2010

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We were one family among the many thousands. Mama and Daddy leaving home, coming to the city, with their hopes and their courage, their dreams and their children, to make a better life.

When Eloise Greenfield was four months old, her family moved from their home in Parmele, North Carolina, to Washington, D.C. Before Jan Spivey Gilchrist was born, her mother moved from Arkansas and her father moved from Mississippi. Both settled in Chicago, Illinois. Though none of them knew it at the time, they had all become part of the Great Migration.

In this collection of poems and collage artwork, award winners Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist gracefully depict the experiences of families like their own, who found the courage to leave their homes behind during The Great Migration and make new lives for themselves elsewhere. The Great Migration concludes with a bibliography.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Eloise Greenfield is the author of an illustrious list of books for young people, includingThe Friendly Four, a Texas 2x2 Reading List book;In the Land of Words, an NCTE Notable Children's Book in the Language Arts; andHow They Got Over: African Americans and the Call of the Sea, winner of a Bank Street Children's Book Award—all illust...
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Title:The Great Migration: Journey to the NorthFormat:HardcoverDimensions:32 pages, 11 × 9 × 0.25 inPublished:December 21, 2010Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0061259217

ISBN - 13:9780061259210

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Editorial Reviews

Praise for Honey, I Love and Other Love Poems: “Abounds with that special tenderness surrounding the everyday experiences in a child’s life. These poems beg to be read aloud.”