The Greatest Trade: How Losing It All Became Life's Biggest Blessing by Steve MeyersThe Greatest Trade: How Losing It All Became Life's Biggest Blessing by Steve Meyers

The Greatest Trade: How Losing It All Became Life's Biggest Blessing

bySteve MeyersAs told byLarry J. Leech

Paperback | February 7, 2017

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The Greatest Tradeis the gripping true story of a cattle trader's son, who begins adulthood by literally betting the family farm-and losing it all in the futures market. In small-town Wyoming, Steven Meyers enjoyed a carefree childhood, rooted in the sound tradition of faith and old-fashioned hard work. When he loses it all-money, faith, relationships-the only thing that keeps him hanging by a thread is the drive to repay the fortune he lost. If he can't do that, Steven can't face the shame of remaining in this life until a powerful supernatural intervention that sets him on the path to financial freedom and the ability to repay all that was lost.
Steve Meyers has been a registered commodities broker since 1987. He successfully predicted the tech stock bubble top in 2000 as well as the mortgage crisis in 2007-2008. Steve Meyers is currently living with his son in Naples, Florida.
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Title:The Greatest Trade: How Losing It All Became Life's Biggest BlessingFormat:PaperbackDimensions:218 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:February 7, 2017Publisher:Morgan James PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1683500377

ISBN - 13:9781683500377

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Do you know what it feels like to lose $480,000 in one day? Better yet, in just ten seconds? Maybe only a gambler or another trader can understand that feeling, that complete sense of loss. A sudden loss. Not being able to feel your limbs is very real, like your extremities are no longer attached to your body. Putting together a string of words for a coherent thought becomes nearly impossible. The earth beneath your feet falls way until reality sets in and you slam back into terra firma with a thud. That thud can drive a man to his knees. To either pray or suffer. I agonized in silence. I couldn't tell my Kathryn, my wife of eleven years at the time. The day before I found out, I'd packed everything Kathryn, our six-year-old son Luke, and I needed into our Cadillac Escalade for a short trip to Atlanta. She needed dental surgery and after months of research settled on a doctor located there. Under the clear blue skies people love in the Sunshine State, we left early from our home in southwest Florida. We weren't super rich like many in the area, but weren't lining up for food stamps either. I drove the first few hours of the nine-hour drive. Somewhere between Sarasota and Tampa, I asked her to take over so I could check on the market. It'd have been easy for me to stay home and manage my accounts from there. This surgery was a big deal to her so I wanted to go for support and help take care of our son. She climbed into the driver's seat and took off. I settled in the passenger seat. Between Tampa and the Georgia line, Interstate 75 has long stretches of wide open spaces dotted with thousands of billboards. The sometimes monotonous hum of the tires on the road can easily lull a passenger to sleep. With my satellite card and adapter from Radio Shack, I plugged in my computer.Ten, fifteen years ago, I wouldn't have been able to accompany her on the trip. I would've stayed home,tied to my desk tracking the market on multiple monitors. But, like many occupations nowadays, modern technology has unchained me from my desk and allowed me to roam free.I roamed right into my market program while my wife barreled toward Atlanta. I let the computer boot up and everything seemed fine. Until I clicked on my actual trade system. A bright red light flashed repeatedly on the screen. My computer made a strange noise like it might lift off from my lap and fly about the automobile. I'd heard stories from friends who watched flames erupt from the vents in their laptops as the hard drive burned up. Worried that I might suffer the same fate, I snatched the adapter from the socket and powered down. I shoved my laptop back into its case and, thinking the problem was the adapter, figured I'd check on my account the next day. We got to the hotel around dinner time and settled in for the evening. I didn't think about the computer or the market for the rest of the night.I should have.