The Greek-Turkish Conflict in the Aegean: Imagined Enemies by A. Heraclides

The Greek-Turkish Conflict in the Aegean: Imagined Enemies

byA. Heraclides

Hardcover | July 7, 2010

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The Aegean dispute is the main Greek-Turkish conflict and threat to peace and security in the region. The book shows that the dispute is solvable (in win-win terms) and that the crux of the problem is not the incompatibility of interests as such but the mutual fears and suspicions, which are deeply rooted in historical memories, real or imagined.

About The Author

ALEXIS HERACLIDES is Professor of International Relations and Conflict Resolution, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece.

Details & Specs

Title:The Greek-Turkish Conflict in the Aegean: Imagined EnemiesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.03 inPublished:July 7, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230218563

ISBN - 13:9780230218567

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Table of Contents

PART I: GREEKS AND TURKS: HISTORY SHROUDED IN NATIONAL MYTH
The Perennial Imagination
Beyond National Mythology
The Modernist Imagination: A 19th Century Conflict
A Contemporary Conflict
From Lausanne to the 1974 Cyprus Crisis
PART II: THE DIPLOMATIC DIMENSION OF THE AEGEAN CONFLICT
The Aegean Dispute: The First Years
The Montreux Spirit (1978-September 1981)
Greek-Turkish Relations at the Nadir (October 1981-1989)
In the Doldrums (1990-February 1999)
The Era of Dtente
PART III: THE LEGAL DIMENSION IF THE AEGEAN CONFLICT
Continental Shelf
Territorial Sea
National Airspace
Demilitarization
Imia/Kardak and Grey Zones
Flight Information Zone and NATO Operational Control
PART IV: THE CRUX OF THE PROBLEM
Problems and Options
The Short Cut
The Long Haul: The Other in National Identity
In Lieu of a Conclusion