The Greeks and their Past: Poetry, Oratory and History in the Fifth Century BCE by Jonas GrethleinThe Greeks and their Past: Poetry, Oratory and History in the Fifth Century BCE by Jonas Grethlein

The Greeks and their Past: Poetry, Oratory and History in the Fifth Century BCE

byJonas Grethlein

Hardcover | March 15, 2010

Pricing and Purchase Info

$134.16

Earn 671 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Ancient Greeks remembered their past before the rise of historiography and after it poetry and oratory continued to serve commemorative functions. This book explores the field of literary memory in the fifth century BCE, juxtaposing the works of Herodotus and Thucydides with samples from epinician poetry, elegy, tragedy and oratory. Various socio-political contexts and narrative forms lent themselves to the expression of diverse attitudes towards the past. At the same time, a common gravitational centre can be observed which is distinct from modern ideas of history. As well as presenting a broad overview on memory in various genres, Professor Grethlein sheds new light on the rise of Greek historiography. He views Herodotus and Thucydides against the background of memory in poetry and oratory and thereby elucidates the tension between tradition and continuity in which the shaping of historiography as a genre took place.
Title:The Greeks and their Past: Poetry, Oratory and History in the Fifth Century BCEFormat:HardcoverDimensions:364 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.83 inPublished:March 15, 2010Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521110777

ISBN - 13:9780521110778

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Introduction; Part I. Clio polytropos: Non-historiographical Media of Memory: 2. Epinician poetry: Pindar, Olympian 2; 3. Elegy: the 'New Simonides' and the past in earlier elegies; 4. Tragedy: Aeschylus, Persae; 5. Epideictic oratory: Lysias, Epitaphios Logos; 6. Deliberative oratory: Andocides, De pace; Part II. The Rise of Greek Historiography: 7. Herodotus; 8. Thucydides; 9. Epilogue: historical fevers, ancient and modern; Appendix: lengthy historical narratives in Tyrtaeus and Mimnermus?

Editorial Reviews

'This is an ambitious, lucid, well-researched and well-organized book ... [It] provides a stimulating argument and one based on much careful analysis of ancient texts and knowledge of the extensive relevant modern scholarship ... One looks forward for more from Jonas Grethlein in the future on these and similar challenging topics.' --Carolyn Dewald, Classical Journal