The Guns Of Normandy: A Soldier's Eye View, France 1944

Paperback | April 26, 1997

byGeorge Blackburn

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In the weeks after D-Day, the level of artillery action in Normandy was unprecedented. In what was a relatively small area, both sides bombarded each other relentlessly for three months, each trying to overwhelm the other by sheer fire power.

The Guns of Normandy puts the reader in the front lines of this horrific battle. In the most graphic and authentic detail, it brings to life every aspect of a soldier’s existence, from the mortal terror of impending destruction, to the unending fatigue, to the giddy exhilaration at finding oneself still, inexplicably, alive.

The story of this crucial battle opens in England, as the 4th Field Regiment receives news that something big is happening in France and that after long years of training they are finally going into action. The troop ships set out from besieged London and arrive at the D-Day beaches in the appalling aftermath of the landing.

What follows is the most harrowing and realistic account of what it is like to be in action, as the very lead man in the attack: an artillery observer calling in fire on enemy positions. The story unfolds in the present tense, giving the uncomfortably real sense that “You are here.”

The conditions under which the troops had to exist were horrific. There was near-constant terror of being hit by incoming shells; prolonged lack of sleep; boredom; weakness from dysentery; sudden and gruesome deaths of close friends; and severe physical privation and mental anguish. And in the face of all this, men were called upon to perform heroic acts of bravery and they did.

Blackburn provides genuine insight to the nature of military service for the average Canadian soldier in the Second World War – something that is all too often lacking in the accounts of armchair historians and television journalists. The result is a classic account of war at the sharp end.


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In the weeks after D-Day, the level of artillery action in Normandy was unprecedented. In what was a relatively small area, both sides bombarded each other relentlessly for three months, each trying to overwhelm the other by sheer fire power.The Guns of Normandy puts the reader in the front lines of this horrific battle. In the most graphic and authentic detail, it brings to life every aspect of a...

George C. Blackburn, M.C., was born in 1917 in a farmhouse near the village of Wales, which disappeared under the waters of the St. Lawrence Seaway. He has been a newspaper reporter, Director of Information of the Federal Labour Department, and Director of Fair Employment Practices. In addition he has been a radio producer, an award-winning documentary scriptwriter, an award-winning playwright, and a lyricist and com...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:536 pages, 8.97 × 6 × 1.17 inPublished:April 26, 1997Publisher:McClelland & Stewart

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0771015038

ISBN - 13:9780771015038

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Canadian Soldier The Guns of Normandy is a masterful narrative by George G. Blackburn. It is a realistic and enthralling epic of a Canadian soldier in action in WWII France and Blackburn brings the reader right onto the field of battle. The book is simply the best of Canadian military history.
Date published: 2000-11-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Gripping, seat of your pants reading George Blackburn has crafted a Canadian war classic. His treatise of the Canadian army experience from Normandy to Falaise is jammed with nonstop realism, never flagging fear and a true Canadian patriotic feeling. A definite must read for any adventurous traveler who craves the "Canadian experience".
Date published: 2000-06-29