The Hardness of Metals

Paperback | July 15, 2000

byD. Tabor

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This book is an attempt to explain hardness measurements of metals in terms of some of their more basic physical properties. It does not deal with the atomic and crystalline mechanism of elastic or plastic deformation, but starting with the elastic and plastic characteristics it shows that thehardness behaviour of metals may be expressed in terms of these characteristics. It is hoped that this presentation will provide, for physicists, engineers, and metallurgists, a better understanding of what hardness means and what hardness measurements imply. The book places an emphasis on thephysical concepts involved, so that the non-mathematical reader may grasp and appreciate the general physical picture without needing to follow the more detailed treatment. From reviews: 'This book is clearly written and illustrated and can be warmly recommended to all those who are interested inthe hardness of metals. It is without doubt the most important work on the subject to have appeared for many years.' Nature 'It is in its fresh and unusual approach to the subject that this book will appeal most. Work from a very wide field is collected and critically discussed, and the author isto be congratulated on a volume which should appeal to metallurgists, engineers and physicists.' Research '...this is a book which the mechanical testing engineer will wish to have ready to hand.' British Journal of Applied Physics 'The story makes fascinating reading, not only because of thewealth of new explanations it contains, but also because of the author's skill in presenting his arguments so clearly and simply. It is extraordinary how far he is able to go on the most elementary of mathematics.' Institute of Metals Metallurgical Abstracts 'Has succeeded in raising the subject ofhardness from its background of empiricism to that of scientific theory....This book is recommended for the scientist who...is concerned with the indentation of solids....The mathematics is simple and the style is easy to read.' Applied Mechanics Reviews

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From the Publisher

This book is an attempt to explain hardness measurements of metals in terms of some of their more basic physical properties. It does not deal with the atomic and crystalline mechanism of elastic or plastic deformation, but starting with the elastic and plastic characteristics it shows that thehardness behaviour of metals may be express...

D. Tabor is at University of Cambridge.

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Format:PaperbackPublished:July 15, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198507763

ISBN - 13:9780198507765

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. Hardness measurements by spherical indenters3. Deformation and indentation of ideal plastic metals4. Deformation of metals by spherical indenters. Ideal plastic metals5. Deformation of metals by spherical indenters. Metals which work-harden6. Deformation of metals by spherical indenters. 'Shallowing' and elastic 'recovery'7. Hardness measurements with conical and pyramidal indenters8. Dynamic or rebound hardness9. Area of contact between solidsAppendix I. Brinell hardnessAppendix II. Meyer hardnessAppendix III. Vickers hardnessAppendix IV. Hardness conversionAppendix V. Hardness and ultimate tensile strengthAppendix VI. Some typical hardness values

Editorial Reviews

'a classic text from Oxford University Press ... Throughout the text, the theories are derived mathematically with concepts developed very clearly within the text ... This is surprisingly readable book' Materials World