The History Of Last Night's Dream: Discovering the Hidden Path to the Soul

Paperback | August 19, 2008

byRodger Kamenetz

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Our Dreams Will Never Be the Same Again

International bestselling author Rodger Kamenetz believes it is not too late to reclaim the lost power of our nightly visions. He fearlessly delves into this mysterious inner realm and shows us that dreams are not only intensely meaningful, but hold essential truths about who we are. In the end, each of us has the choice to embark on this illuminating path to the soul.

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Our Dreams Will Never Be the Same AgainInternational bestselling author Rodger Kamenetz believes it is not too late to reclaim the lost power of our nightly visions. He fearlessly delves into this mysterious inner realm and shows us that dreams are not only intensely meaningful, but hold essential truths about who we are. In the end, e...

Roger Kamenetz wrote the landmark international bestseller,The Jew in the Lotus, and the winner of the National Jewish Book Award,Stalking Eljah. He is a Louisiana State University Distinguished Professor of English and Religious Studies and a certified dream therapist. He lives in New Orleans with his wife, fiction writer Moira Crone.

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Hardcover|Oct 19 2010

$26.20 online$28.95list price(save 9%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.65 inPublished:August 19, 2008Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0061237949

ISBN - 13:9780061237942

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“Rodger Kamenetz’s vividly honest and well-reswearched book on dreams in Western culture is extraordinary-- in part for its defiance of genre...Before I read it had heard Kamenetz refer to it as a memoir, but it as much an argument for a paradigm shift in dream interpretation.”