The History Of New Zealand

Hardcover | June 30, 2004

byTom Brooking

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With its closest neighbor some 1,200 miles away, New Zealand is one of the most geographically isolated countries in the world. Its remoteness led to its relatively late settlement. Brooking traces New Zealand from its earliest Maori settlers to issues in 2003, covering intertribal relations, the effects of European contact, the challenges of globalization, and more. The volume includes a timeline of historical events, biographical entries of notable people in the history of New Zealand, a glossary of Maori terms, and a bibliographic essay. This concise, engagingly written volume is ideal for students and general interest readers seeking information on New Zealand's history.

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With its closest neighbor some 1,200 miles away, New Zealand is one of the most geographically isolated countries in the world. Its remoteness led to its relatively late settlement. Brooking traces New Zealand from its earliest Maori settlers to issues in 2003, covering intertribal relations, the effects of European contact, the challe...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:250 pages, 9.56 × 6.44 × 1.02 inPublished:June 30, 2004Publisher:Greenwood Press (CT)Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313323569

ISBN - 13:9780313323560

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"Brooking has produced an excellent volume that deserves to be well read by its target American audience....[t]his book communicates the dynamism and energy of New Zealand history. This is, after all, the story of a geographically isolated thin archipelago, located twelve hundred miles from its nearest neighbor, Australia, from whom it constantly seeks to differentiate itself. Although New Zealand was one of the last places on earth to be settled by humans and can boast a number of world "firsts," Brooking neither lapses into cliche nor is tempted towards stereotype."-The Historian