The House of Bondage: Or Charlotte Brooks and Other Slaves

Paperback | May 1, 1994

byOctavia V. Rogers AlbertIntroduction byFrances Smith Foster

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Setting out to correct the inaccuracies of most previously written accounts of slavery, teacher and social activist Octavia Albert presents the personal narratives of former slaves, along with her own incisive commentary. Like many antebellum slave narratives, her early interviews depictcruel punishments, divided families, and the debilitating effects of unusually harsh labor. But as Albert came to see herself as a public advocate for social change, her focus shifted to the condition and progress of former slaves. The later interviews reflect her insistence that every Christianpersonally take some responsibility for slavery's legacies and lessons.

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Setting out to correct the inaccuracies of most previously written accounts of slavery, teacher and social activist Octavia Albert presents the personal narratives of former slaves, along with her own incisive commentary. Like many antebellum slave narratives, her early interviews depictcruel punishments, divided families, and the deb...

Frances Smith Foster is at San Diego State University.

other books by Octavia V. Rogers Albert

see all books by Octavia V. Rogers Albert
Format:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 6.46 × 4.65 × 0.63 inPublished:May 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195067843

ISBN - 13:9780195067842

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"The personal narratives, especially a group narrative like Octavia Albert's 'House of Bondage' (1890), were a means of perserving fragile antebellum life history as the slave generations grew old and died. Just as important, they provided a counterweight against the plantation myth and thedenigration of black freedom being generated by respected white novelists such as Thomas Nelson Page and Thomas Dixon, and historians such as James Ford Rhodes."--Eric J. Sundquist in The New York Times Book Review quist