The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

Paperback | February 25, 2010

byN. K. Jemisin

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Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history.

With the fate of the world hanging in the balance, Yeine will learn how perilous it can be when love and hate - and gods and mortals - are bound inseparably together.
The Inheritance TrilogyThe Hundred Thousand KingdomsThe Broken KingdomsThe Kingdom of Gods
The Inheritance Trilogy(omnibus edition)Shades in Shadow: An Inheritance Triptych(e-only short fiction)The Awakened Kingdom(e-only novella)
For more from N. K. Jemisin, check out:
Dreamblood DuologyThe Killing MoonThe Shadowed Sun
The Broken EarthThe Fifth SeasonThe Obelisk Gate

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From the Publisher

Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with co...

N. K. Jemisin is a Brooklyn author whose short fiction and novels have been nominated multiple times for the Hugo, the World Fantasy Award, and the Nebula, shortlisted for the Crawford and the Tiptree, and have won the Locus Award. She is a science fiction and fantasy reviewer for theNew York Times,and her novelThe Fifth Seasonwas aNew...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1.25 inPublished:February 25, 2010Publisher:OrbitLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0316043915

ISBN - 13:9780316043915

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Rated 3 out of 5 by from The hundred thousand kingdoms Although the author has incredible voice and starts out strong the main character waffles too much near the middle and end of the novel, making it a little difficult to continue. The world building is terrific, and the supporting cast is small but complex. Exempting the wishy washy nature that emerges in Yeine, the characters are intriguing, but some clearly deserve more spotlight. As with any author, there are favorites who dominate the scene often unnecessarily, which is slightly disappointing. The overarching story is interesting, and if it had been fleshed out a bit more it would've been a magnificent five star read. With first person perspective, you have to commit to making the main character likeabIe and relatable, which was often not the case, and the included romance seems hashed in to develop the story when it should be the other way around. I would still recommend this novel to readers looking for a slight romance with heavy fantasy elements, as it is an easy read with great dialogue and structure. 3.5\5 stars
Date published: 2015-05-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very interesting read Excellent, very different from my usual reading, hard to get started but once you start, the story unique message,ideas come a live
Date published: 2014-12-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very interesting read Relatively speaking, I tore through this book. It's been a long time since I have decided that reading was more important than sleep, and I would stay up, sometimes, two hours past my bed time to read more of this book. In short, I was really intrigued and excited. The first two or three chapters were slow moving. Sometimes I have difficulty following plot points when immediately thrown into a new world (it feels a lot like having difficulty memorizing streets when traveling in a new place for the first time), and this book did that to me. Once I got used to the world, however, things really picked up. One thing about me is that I LOVE creation mythology, and this book had a great deal of that. I love fantasy novels with new religions, but I especially love to be told the stories that the followers (and in this case, past followers) are told and tell. There was a great deal of that, and it kept me going. Additionally, I liked many of the gods I was supposed to like, and sympathized with them wholeheartedly. I'm not sure if I should have felt that way - we are often presented with the fact that they have their own motives and should be trusted. However, Yeine never seemed to strongly feel that way, so maybe that was why. I liked that Yeine was not always strong and was not always weak. This made her a complex character, which I very much liked. I enjoyed being able to understand her motivations, even when I realized that mine would have been very different. The fact that I could sympathize with some decisions that may not have been the best makes for some good reading. I do not very much enjoy romance in my books, because often the book is taken over by the romance and that's all the book becomes. This book was so much better than that, I actually enjoyed reading about Yeine's romantic feelings (minus the last sex scene in the book, which just kind of felt awkward... but, then, I guess it would be kind of awkward to have sex with a god) as they did not seem to be her entire motivation. I think my biggest qualm was that the book ended too easily. Everything wrapped up neatly. Which might have been okay had the whole book not presented such complications to Yeine. Knowing that The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is part of a trilogy makes me feel a little better about it, but not a lot. I think that was why I took off a star. I would definitely recommend this book to others. I am not sure if it will be one of the books that I read again from needing to be part of that world again, but that may be for the best - very few of the secondary characters are worth spending time with again (which is what they are supposed to be like, so it's not from bad writing). I am very much interested in reading the second book. If I could, I would have given it 4.5 stars.
Date published: 2014-02-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Epic Fantasy! N.K. Jemisin’s debut adult fantasy novel drew me in right from the first few lines. The story follows 19 year old Yeine Darr, an outcast from the barbarian north. Summoned to the beautiful city of Sky – a city up in the clouds, suspended there by a thin pillar – Yeine finds herself an unwilling participant in a vicious and deadly power struggle. Because it is there that she is named a potential heiress to her estranged Arameri grandfather as ruler of the world. Now Yeine has no choice but to compete with two cousins for power she doesn’t even want. And the city of Sky holds many other secrets: strange rooms, hobbled gods, and her family’s blood-stained history. Seeking the truth behind her mother’s passing and surviving the battle with the other heirs for Arameri rulership are not the only things Yeine has to worry about. Because she has also caught the attention of the Enefadeh: four gods who are the Arameri’s slaves. Now, not only is Yeine’s life in danger, but the fate of the world hangs in the balance – even the fate of the gods. Gods who plan to use Yeine for their own purposes. Gods who can easily level mountains and destroy whole armies, but instead act as playthings to the Arameri. This is a smart, unpredictable fantasy with a very distinctive voice. And what’s a story of family and gods and hate without a little bit of love? I loved that the romantic arc is different; it doesn’t feel forced or cliche, and it doesn’t take over the entire story. Overall, this is a contemplative fantasy with a strong heroine, secrets, political intrigue, and love. With fantastic, well-thought out world-building, this is one title you shouldn’t miss if you love to read fantasy. It’s a fantastic adult fantasy that YA fantasy readers will enjoy. For my full review, check out:
Date published: 2012-03-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Talk about debuting with a bang... Wow. Just wow. This one really caught me by surprise. It was recommended to me by a friend and I decided to give it a shot because they claimed "it's her debut novel, and it's as good a debut as Jacqueline Carey or Patrick Rothfuss had!". "Well," I said to myself "if it's THAT good, then I'm obliged to read it." So I picked up a copy and it blew my socks off. I simply cannot believe how well this book is written, especially how the atmosphere and world is built. It really is a good as Kushiel's Dart or The Name of the Wind. I was left stunned at Yeine Darr's fate at the end of this novel's wild tale. So here I am, telling YOU that YOU HAVE TO READ THIS BOOK!
Date published: 2010-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible Debut Pros: a lot of good interpersonal relationships, unique mythology, excellent worldbuilding, interesting characters (particularly Sieh), some romance Cons: the political maneuverings of the potential heirs takes a back seat to other affairs (which is only a con in that I was expecting the book to deal more with the politics of the Kingdoms) The Hundred Thousands Kingdoms is a fantasy novel that grabbed my interest from page one and didn't let it go. Yeine Darr is narrating 2 very interesting weeks of her life. At times she interrupts her own story to mention something she forgot to say earlier or something about the world and its people she thinks you should know. This makes for an engaging read as it's almost like being around a camp fire and hearing a live storyteller (in the way that dialogue feels real even though people don't speak the way dialogue is presented). Yeine is a leader among her 'barbarian' people. She is also the half-blood granddaughter of the current ruler of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms. And he has called her to Sky for reasons she does not know. While there, she plans to force her grandfather to admit to her mother's murder. But once in Sky Yeine meets Nahadoth, Sieh, Kurue and Zhakkarn, one of the Three Gods and his children. They were defeated by Bright Itempas and made slaves to and weapons for the Kingdoms' Arameri rulers. And they have their own plans for Yeine. Jemisin has developed a distinctive voice, which was a pleasure to read. Her characters are engaging and sympathetic - even when they're doing things you otherwise wouldn't agree with. The plot is deceptively simple, gaining in complexity as the story progresses. You'll think you know what the ending is going to be. You don't. The contest between Yeine and her cousins to see who will become the heir to the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms was more of a backdrop to other events than the main plot, which surprised me. I would have liked to see more of the conflict - backbiting, political maneuvering, etc. The Gods and their history are fascinating. From their various births, their jealousy, hatred and love, to the war that rips them apart, you can't wait to learn more about them. It's a great book and the sequel promises to show more of the world Jemisin has created.
Date published: 2010-03-02