The Hydrogen Jukebox: Selected Writings of Peter Schjeldahl, 1978-1990 by Peter SchjeldahlThe Hydrogen Jukebox: Selected Writings of Peter Schjeldahl, 1978-1990 by Peter Schjeldahl

The Hydrogen Jukebox: Selected Writings of Peter Schjeldahl, 1978-1990

byPeter SchjeldahlEditorMaLin WilsonIntroduction byRobert Storr

Paperback | March 29, 1993

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A collection of the essays of art critic and poet Peter Schjeldahl, which explores his thoughts on individual contemporary artists, their work, events and ethics in the art world and new, creative directions.
Peter Schjeldahl is art critic for the Village Voice and contributing editor for Art in America. MaLin Wilson is an art critic, editor, and independent curator working in New Mexico. Robert Storr, an artist and writer, is currently a curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
Title:The Hydrogen Jukebox: Selected Writings of Peter Schjeldahl, 1978-1990Format:PaperbackDimensions:380 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:March 29, 1993Publisher:University of California Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0520082826

ISBN - 13:9780520082823

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From Our Editors

Schjeldahl provides a sharp perspective on individual artists, their work, art-world events and ethics, and new, creative directions. Above all, he challenges established views, infecting readers with his passion for art. "To read Schjeldahl is not to agree or disagree, but rather to enter the enchanting flow of a fertile imagination".--Art in America. (HC:1991

Editorial Reviews

"A shrewd and fluent critic, [Schjeldahl] has a masterly personal voice, flamboyant, witty, lyrical yet often precise; more important, he has an open-hearted attentiveness to the subjects of his criticism and the imaginative spaces around them."--"Times Literary Supplement