The Icarus Syndrome: A History of American Hubris by Peter BeinartThe Icarus Syndrome: A History of American Hubris by Peter Beinart

The Icarus Syndrome: A History of American Hubris

byPeter Beinart

Paperback | May 31, 2011

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“Why do we succumb to hubris? Peter Beinart has written a highly intelligent and wonderfully readable book that answers the question by looking at a century of American foreign policy. As with everything Beinart writes, it is lucid, thoughtful and strikingly honest.” — Fareed Zakaria, author of The Post-American World

“Peter Beinart has written a vivid, empathetic, and convincing history of the men and ideas that have shaped the ambitions of American foreign policy during the last century—a story in which human fallibility and idealism flow together. The story continues, of course, and so his book is not only timely; it is indispensible.” — Steve Coll, author of Ghost Wars

Peter Beinart, one of the nation’s leading political writers, offers a provocative and strikingly original account of American hubris throughout history—and how we learn from the tragedies that result.

Peter Beinart is an associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York and a senior fellow at the New America Foundation. He is the senior political writer forThe Daily Beastand a contributor toTime. Beinart is a former fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author ofThe Good Fight. H...
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Title:The Icarus Syndrome: A History of American HubrisFormat:PaperbackDimensions:496 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.92 inPublished:May 31, 2011Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0061456470

ISBN - 13:9780061456473

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“Beinart is at his most illuminating when he lingers on forgotten episodes that reveal how difficult it is to understand the implications of any event at any given moment—the extent to which everyone is a prisoner of past failure or past success.”