The Iliad: (penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

by Bernard Homer
Translated by Robert Fagles
Introduction by Bernard Knox

Penguin Publishing Group | November 15, 1998 | Trade Paperback

The Iliad: (penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) is rated 4.83333333333333 out of 5 by 6.
The great war epic of Western literature, translated by acclaimed classicist Robert Fagles
 
Dating to the ninth century B.C., Homer’s timeless poem still vividly conveys the horror and heroism of men and gods wrestling with towering emotions and battling amidst devastation and destruction, as it moves inexorably to the wrenching, tragic conclusion of the Trojan War. Renowned classicist Bernard Knox observes in his superb introduction that although the violence of the Iliad is grim and relentless, it coexists with both images of civilized life and a poignant yearning for peace.
 
Combining the skills of a poet and scholar, Robert Fagles, winner of the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation and a 1996 Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, brings the energy of contemporary language to this enduring heroic epic. He maintains the drive and metric music of Homer’s poetry, and evokes the impact and nuance of the Iliad’s mesmerizing repeated phrases in what Peter Levi calls “an astonishing performance.”

This Penguin Classics Deluxe edition also features French flaps and deckle-edged paper.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 704 pages, 8.38 × 5.7 × 1.7 in

Published: November 15, 1998

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140275363

ISBN - 13: 9780140275360

Found in: Classics, Poetry

save 45%

  • In stock online
$25.00 list price

$13.53 ea online

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great war epic This is a great book for anybody who is interested in greek history/mythology. As a fan of greco-roman themes I have watched many movies about the Trojan war, so it was interesting to finally read what is the basis for those films. It was interesting to see how dramatically different the movies are from the source material. The book ends before the sacking of Troy but to get answers from Homer read "The Odyssey" as it gives a few answers to what happened to some of the characters. This is one of my favourite books!!
Date published: 2008-01-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing This book was great. Was hard but easy at the same time. Homer is a amzing writer and would suggest this book to anyone wanting to read something new!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing this book is very very good. By page 20 I was hooked. This verson of the Iliad isn't that hard espically if you are someone who reads a lot. I would recomen this book to anyone how already likes poetry, getting into poetry or has never read poetry in there lifes.
Date published: 2005-06-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read I picked this book up to read for school. I expected it to be a boring but it was a fantastic book filled with similes and imagery. It's was like going to the movies since the book goes in depth about the taste, the sounds, and the action. It felt as if the reader was at the Trojan war.
Date published: 2005-02-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Universal Required Reading Homer's first epic poem displays the range of human emotions and vices from bravery to jealousy and envy in a wonderfully narrated tale. This ancient work should be required reading for all of humanity.
Date published: 2003-07-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from All Hail, HOMER There is nothing that compares to the artistic delivery of such a respected author. Homer paints the story with such passion and power that includes the reader as either a Trojan Warrior or a Greek Soldier! Excellent!
Date published: 2000-01-28

– More About This Product –

The Iliad: (penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

The Iliad: (penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

by Bernard Homer
Translated by Robert Fagles
Introduction by Bernard Knox

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 704 pages, 8.38 × 5.7 × 1.7 in

Published: November 15, 1998

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140275363

ISBN - 13: 9780140275360

Table of Contents

The IliadTranslator's Preface

Introduction
Introduction
The Spelling and Pronunciation of Homeric Names
Maps

Homer: The Iliad
Book 1: The Rage of Achilles
Book 2: The Great Gathering of Armies
Book 3: Helen Reviews the Champions
Book 4: The Truce Erupts in War
Book 5: Diomodes Fights the Gods
Book 6: Hector Returns to Troy
Book 7: Ajax Duels in Hector
Book 8: The Tide of Battle Turns
Book 9: The Embassy to Achilles
Book 10: Marauding Through the Night
Book 11: Agamemnon's Day of Glory
Book 12: The Trojans Storm the Rampart
Book 13: Battling for the Ships
Book 14: Hera Outflanks Zeus
Book 15: The Achaean Armies at Bay
Book 16: Patroclus Fights and Dies
Book 17: Menalaus' Finest Hour
Book 18: The Shield of Achilles
Book 19: The Champion Arms for Battle
Book 20: olympian Gods in Arms
Book 21: Achilles Fights the River
Book 22: The Death of Hector
Book 23: Funeral Games for Patroclus
Book 24: Achilles and Priam

Notes
The Genealogy of the Royal House of Troy
Textual Variants from the Oxford Classical Text
Notes on the Translation
Suggestions for Further Reading
Pronouncing Glossary

From the Publisher

The great war epic of Western literature, translated by acclaimed classicist Robert Fagles
 
Dating to the ninth century B.C., Homer’s timeless poem still vividly conveys the horror and heroism of men and gods wrestling with towering emotions and battling amidst devastation and destruction, as it moves inexorably to the wrenching, tragic conclusion of the Trojan War. Renowned classicist Bernard Knox observes in his superb introduction that although the violence of the Iliad is grim and relentless, it coexists with both images of civilized life and a poignant yearning for peace.
 
Combining the skills of a poet and scholar, Robert Fagles, winner of the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation and a 1996 Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, brings the energy of contemporary language to this enduring heroic epic. He maintains the drive and metric music of Homer’s poetry, and evokes the impact and nuance of the Iliad’s mesmerizing repeated phrases in what Peter Levi calls “an astonishing performance.”

This Penguin Classics Deluxe edition also features French flaps and deckle-edged paper.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

About the Author

Homer was probably born around 725BC on the Coast of Asia Minor, now the coast of Turkey, but then really a part of Greece. Homer was the first Greek writer whose work survives. He was one of a long line of bards, or poets, who worked in the oral tradition. Homer and other bards of the time could recite, or chant, long epic poems. Both works attributed to Homer – the Iliad and the Odyssey – are over ten thousand lines long in the original. Homer must have had an amazing memory but was helped by the formulaic poetry style of the time.In the Iliad Homer sang of death and glory, of a few days in the struggle between the Greeks and the Trojans. Mortal men played out their fate under the gaze of the gods. The Odyssey is the original collection of tall traveller’s tales. Odysseus, on his way home from the Trojan War, encounters all kinds of marvels from one-eyed giants to witches and beautiful temptresses. His adventures are many and memorable before he gets back to Ithaca and his faithful wife Penelope.We can never be certain that both these stories belonged to Homer. In fact ‘Homer’ may not be a real name but a kind of nickname meaning perhaps ‘the hostage’ or ‘the blind one’. Whatever the truth of their origin, the two stories, developed around three thousand years ago, may well still be read in three thousand years’ time.Robert Fagles (1933-2008) was Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Comparative Literature, Emeritus, at Princeton University. He was the recipient of the 1997 PEN/
read more read less

From Our Editors

It is one of mankind's greatest and most epic of stories. The Iliad tells the exciting story of the Trojan War and Achilles' anger, and features fascinating heroines, heroes and gods dealing with a tremendous battle. Poet and scholar Robert Fagles presents his universally-acclaimed modern-verse translation of Homer's great war story in an exquisite edition with French flaps. This companion volume to The Odyssey will delight fans of classical poetry and prose.

Editorial Reviews

“Fitzgerald has solved virtually every problem that has plagued translators of Homer. The narrative runs, the dialogue speaks, the military action is clear, and the repetitive epithets become useful text rather than exotic relics.” –Atlantic Monthly

“Fitzgerald’s swift rhythms, bright images, and superb English make Homer live as never before…This is for every reader in our time and possibly for all time.”–Library Journal

“[Fitzgerald’s Odyssey and Iliad] open up once more the unique greatness of Homer’s art at the level above the formula; yet at the same time they do not neglect the brilliant texture of Homeric verse at the level of the line and the phrase.” –The Yale Review

“What an age can read in Homer, what its translators can manage to say in his presence, is one gauge of its morale, one index to its system of exultations and reticences. The supple, the iridescent, the ironic, these modes are among our strengths, and among Mr. Fitzgerald’s.” –National Review

With an Introduction by Gregory Nagy