Homer was probably born around 725BC on the Coast of Asia Minor, now the coast of Turkey, but then really a part of Greece. Homer was the first Greek writer whose work survives. He was one of a long line of bards, or poets, who worked in the oral tradition. Homer and other bards of the time could recite, or chant, long epic poems. Both...
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Title:The IliadFormat:Mass Market PaperbackDimensions:400 pages, 6.75 × 4.19 × 1.06 inPublished:October 2, 2007Publisher:Penguin Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0451530691

ISBN - 13:9780451530691

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from great easy to read translation of a classic
Date published: 2017-11-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exceptional translation This is one of the best translations around. On par with the Fitzgerald translation. Next best thing to reading it in the original.
Date published: 2017-10-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read A classic story, well written and very captivating!
Date published: 2017-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read A classic story, well written and very captivating!
Date published: 2017-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read A classic story, well written and very captivating!
Date published: 2017-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read A classic story, well written and very captivating!
Date published: 2017-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great love this edition, an important read
Date published: 2017-05-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent translation. Not as daunting as you'd think. This is an amazing translation. It is very easy to read and pronunciations are not an issue. When got this book I thought it would be a huge job to get through it but it actually reads very easily and is highly entertaining.
Date published: 2017-01-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent book Perhaps not as revered as Homer's other book, but this one is still great. There are some parts that seem a little repetitive towards the end, but the story overall is so great that this is easy to overlook.
Date published: 2017-01-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Translation Great translation of the world's greatest war story - the first and still the best.
Date published: 2016-12-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Worth the Read The Iliad may seem daunting but it is worth reading. The story itself is very interesting, it's quite different than the tales that have been depicted in movies and tv.
Date published: 2016-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A tale of humanity and war. In this translation of Iliad we are immersed in an epic tale of humanity in the midst of war, the story of Hector to protect his city, Achilles for glory then terrible revenge. We see the pathos of humanity contrasted with the tantrums of the gods. Through his tale Homer explores the consequences of war, it's glory and cost.
Date published: 2016-11-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from i will never stop reading this book This book was so great i loved it so much!!!
Date published: 2016-11-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fascinating and Epic. #plumreview Perhaps the most interesting this epic war classic has to offer is the differing take on morality for ancient Greeks. To what may seem petulant and immature to modern readers, Achilles demands a completely understandable and in fact moral within the Ancient Greek view. A good primer that morality may not be as set in stone as we tend to think in modern times.
Date published: 2016-11-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great war epic This is a great book for anybody who is interested in greek history/mythology. As a fan of greco-roman themes I have watched many movies about the Trojan war, so it was interesting to finally read what is the basis for those films. It was interesting to see how dramatically different the movies are from the source material. The book ends before the sacking of Troy but to get answers from Homer read "The Odyssey" as it gives a few answers to what happened to some of the characters. This is one of my favourite books!!
Date published: 2008-01-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing This book was great. Was hard but easy at the same time. Homer is a amzing writer and would suggest this book to anyone wanting to read something new!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing this book is very very good. By page 20 I was hooked. This verson of the Iliad isn't that hard espically if you are someone who reads a lot. I would recomen this book to anyone how already likes poetry, getting into poetry or has never read poetry in there lifes.
Date published: 2005-06-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read I picked this book up to read for school. I expected it to be a boring but it was a fantastic book filled with similes and imagery. It's was like going to the movies since the book goes in depth about the taste, the sounds, and the action. It felt as if the reader was at the Trojan war.
Date published: 2005-02-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Universal Required Reading Homer's first epic poem displays the range of human emotions and vices from bravery to jealousy and envy in a wonderfully narrated tale. This ancient work should be required reading for all of humanity.
Date published: 2003-07-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from All Hail, HOMER There is nothing that compares to the artistic delivery of such a respected author. Homer paints the story with such passion and power that includes the reader as either a Trojan Warrior or a Greek Soldier! Excellent!
Date published: 2000-01-28

Editorial Reviews

“Fitzgerald has solved virtually every problem that has plagued translators of Homer. The narrative runs, the dialogue speaks, the military action is clear, and the repetitive epithets become useful text rather than exotic relics.” –Atlantic Monthly “Fitzgerald’s swift rhythms, bright images, and superb English make Homer live as never before…This is for every reader in our time and possibly for all time.”–Library Journal “[Fitzgerald’s Odyssey and Iliad] open up once more the unique greatness of Homer’s art at the level above the formula; yet at the same time they do not neglect the brilliant texture of Homeric verse at the level of the line and the phrase.” –The Yale Review“What an age can read in Homer, what its translators can manage to say in his presence, is one gauge of its morale, one index to its system of exultations and reticences. The supple, the iridescent, the ironic, these modes are among our strengths, and among Mr. Fitzgerald’s.” –National ReviewWith an Introduction by Gregory Nagy