The Indian Periodical Press and the Production of Nationalist Rhetoric

Hardcover | October 15, 2011

bySukeshi Kamra

not yet rated|write a review

This book relates the dramatic story of the struggle that took place between the Indian press and the British government for control of the Indian public sphere between 1870 and 1910. The contest gave the Indian reading publics their first taste of a struggle conducted from within the confines of the law, introduced vocabularies for conceiving counter-discursivity and defined the press and the government as distinct and opposed communities. Sukeshi Kamra deftly shows that the increasingly antagonistic relationship between the press and colonial regime is where and how a nationalist public sphere first developed.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$142.98 online
$143.00 list price
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

This book relates the dramatic story of the struggle that took place between the Indian press and the British government for control of the Indian public sphere between 1870 and 1910. The contest gave the Indian reading publics their first taste of a struggle conducted from within the confines of the law, introduced vocabularies for co...

Sukeshi Kamra is an associate professor in the English Department and an associate dean in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Carleton University. She has published a book on the partition of India and articles on nationalist India and Indian literature.

other books by Sukeshi Kamra

Format:HardcoverDimensions:248 pages, 8.62 × 5.73 × 0.77 inPublished:October 15, 2011Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230116590

ISBN - 13:9780230116597

Customer Reviews of The Indian Periodical Press and the Production of Nationalist Rhetoric

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

“Ungoverned Imaginings”: The Periodical Press, Government Culture, and the Making of the Indian Public, 1870-1910 * Native Revolt: Verbal Culture of 1857 and the Politics of Fear * Law and the Periodical Culture of the 1870s: A Culture of Complaint or Something More? * Criminalizing Political Conversation I: The 1891 Trial of the Bangavasi * The “Infernal Machine” of Propaganda Literature: The Native Press of 1907-1910 * Criminalizing Political Conversation II: The 1910 Trial of the Pallichitra