The Invention of Evening: Perception and Time in Romantic Poetry by Christopher R. MillerThe Invention of Evening: Perception and Time in Romantic Poetry by Christopher R. Miller

The Invention of Evening: Perception and Time in Romantic Poetry

byChristopher R. Miller

Paperback | November 19, 2009

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Lyric poetry has long been considered an art form of timelessness, but Romantic poets became fascinated by one time above all others: evening, the threshold between day and night. Christopher R. Miller investigates the cultural background of this development. The tradition of evening poetry runs from the idyllic settings of Virgil to the urban twilights of T. S. Eliot, and flourished in the works of Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats. In fresh readings of familiar Romantic poems, Miller shows how evening settings enabled poets to represent the passage of time and to associate it with subtle movements of thought and perception. This leads to new ways of reading canonical works, and of thinking about the kinds of themes the lyric can express.
Title:The Invention of Evening: Perception and Time in Romantic PoetryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:280 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.63 inPublished:November 19, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521123496

ISBN - 13:9780521123495

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Table of Contents

Preface; 1. The pre-history of Romantic time; 2. Coleridge's lyric 'moment'; 3. Wordsworth's evening voluntaries; 4. Shelley's 'woven hymns of night and day'; 5. Keats and the 'Luxury of Twilight'; 6. Later inventions.

Editorial Reviews

"It is an impressive and versatile book, with good things to say about all its poets, and perhaps especially attentive to the multiplicity of voices in Coleridge...It is a celebratory book, and part of its literary pleasure gets into its own style; it enjoys here and there a Stevensish flamboyance."
-Seamus Perry, Balliol College Oxford, The Review of English Studies