The Invisible Enemy: A Natural History Of Viruses by Dorothy CrawfordThe Invisible Enemy: A Natural History Of Viruses by Dorothy Crawford

The Invisible Enemy: A Natural History Of Viruses

byDorothy Crawford

Paperback | March 1, 2002

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Viruses are disarmingly small and simple. None the less, the smallpox virus killed over 300 million people in the 20th century prior to its eradication in 1980. The AIDS virus, HIV, is now the single most common cause of death in Africa. In recent years, the outbreaks of several lethal virusessuch as Ebola and hanta virus have caused great public concern.In her fascinating and vividly written book, Dorothy Crawford describes all aspects of the natural history of these deadly parasites, explaining how they differ from other microorganisms. She looks at the havoc viruses have caused in the past, where they have come from, and the detective workinvolved in uncovering them. Finally, she considers whether a new virus could potentially wipe out the human race.This is an informative and highly readable book, which will be read by all those seeking a deeper understanding of these minute but remarkably efficient killers.
Dorothy Crawford is at University of Edinburgh.
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Title:The Invisible Enemy: A Natural History Of VirusesFormat:PaperbackPublished:March 1, 2002Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198564813

ISBN - 13:9780198564812

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Table of Contents

Sir Anthony Epstein: ForewordIntroduction: The deadly parasites1. Bugs, germs, and microbes2. New viruses or old adversaries3. Coughs and sneezes spread disease4. Unlike love, herpes is forever5. Viruses and cancer6. Searching for a cureConclusion: The future, friends, or foeIndex

Editorial Reviews

`"...this fascinating book provides a rapid and accessible introduction to modern virology".'Nature