The 'Invisible Hand' and British Fiction, 1818-1860: Adam Smith, Political Economy, and the Genre of Realism by E. CourtemancheThe 'Invisible Hand' and British Fiction, 1818-1860: Adam Smith, Political Economy, and the Genre of Realism by E. Courtemanche

The 'Invisible Hand' and British Fiction, 1818-1860: Adam Smith, Political Economy, and the Genre…

byE. Courtemanche

Hardcover | April 12, 2011

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The 'invisible hand', Adam Smith's metaphor for the morality of capitalism, is explored in this text as being far more subtle and intricate than is usually understood, with many British realist fiction writers (Austen, Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot) having absorbed his model of ironic causality in complex societies and turned it to their own purposes.
ELEANOR COURTEMANCHE Assistant Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. She has also taught at Colby College, Macalester College, Claremont McKenna College, and Carleton College. In addition to Victorian studies, her research interests include German fiction, narrative theory, and the intersection be...
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Title:The 'Invisible Hand' and British Fiction, 1818-1860: Adam Smith, Political Economy, and the Genre…Format:HardcoverDimensions:251 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.63 inPublished:April 12, 2011Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230290787

ISBN - 13:9780230290785

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements Introduction: Capitalist Moral Philosophy, Narrative Technology, and the Bounded Nation-State PART I: READING ADAM SMITH Imaginary Vantage Points: The Invisible Hand and the Rise of Political Economy PART II: EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY NOVELS AND INVISIBLE HAND SOCIAL THEORY Omniscient Narrators and the Return of the Gothic in Northanger Abbey and Bleak House Providential Endings: Martineau, Dickens, and the Didactic Task of Political Economy Ripple Effects and the Fog of War in Vanity Fair Inappropriate Sympathies in Gaskell and Eliot Conclusion: Realist Capitalism, Gothic Capitalism Bibliography Index