The Italian Renaissance Palace Façade: Structures of Authority, Surfaces of Sense by Charles BurroughsThe Italian Renaissance Palace Façade: Structures of Authority, Surfaces of Sense by Charles Burroughs

The Italian Renaissance Palace Façade: Structures of Authority, Surfaces of Sense

byCharles Burroughs

Paperback | April 30, 2009

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The architectural facade -- a crucial and ubiquitous element of traditional cityscapes -- addresses and enhances the space of the city, while displaying or dissembling interior arrangements. Burroughs traces the development of the Italian Renaissance palace facade as a cultural, architectural and spatial phenomenon, and as a new way of setting a limit to and defining a private sphere. He draws on literary evidence and analyses of significant Renaissance buildings, noting the paucity of explicit discussion of the theme in an era of extensive architectural publishing.
Title:The Italian Renaissance Palace Façade: Structures of Authority, Surfaces of SenseFormat:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 9.61 × 6.69 × 0.67 inPublished:April 30, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521109736

ISBN - 13:9780521109734

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. The forked road to modernity: ambiguities of the Renaissance facade; 2. Domestic architecture and Boccaccian drama: court and city in Florentine culture; 3. Between opacity and rhetoric: the facade in Trecento Florence; 4. The facade in question: Brunelleschi; 5. The bones of grammar and the rhetoric of flesh; 6. Setting and subject: the city of presences and the street as stage; 7. Bramante and the emblematic facade; 8. Facades on parade: architecture between court and city; 9. From street to territory: projections of the urban facade; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"...Burrough's interpretive framework offers a welcome and stimulating reconsideration of many subjects." Sixteenth Century Journal, Andrew Hopkins, Villa I Tatti, Florence