The Kaisers Army: The Politics of Military Technology in Germany during the Machine Age, 1870-1918

Paperback | September 30, 2004

byEric Dorn Brose

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This volume covers a fascinating period in the history of the German army, a time in which machine guns, airplanes, and weapons of mass destruction were first developed and used. Eric Brose traces the industrial development of machinery and its application to infantry, cavalry, and artillerytactics. He examines the modernity versus anti-modernity debate that raged after the Franco-Prussian war, arguing that the residue of years of resistance to technological change seriously undermined the German army during World War I.

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This volume covers a fascinating period in the history of the German army, a time in which machine guns, airplanes, and weapons of mass destruction were first developed and used. Eric Brose traces the industrial development of machinery and its application to infantry, cavalry, and artillerytactics. He examines the modernity versus ant...

Eric Dorn Brose is Professor of History and Head of the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 5.59 × 8.82 × 0.79 inPublished:September 30, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195179455

ISBN - 13:9780195179453

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"Brose has written a lively and highly readable account of the debates over technological innovation and the institutional, tactical, and operational implications of the new weapons. His book is based on solid research and provides further convincing evidence that the German army was notquite the awesome fighting machine that it has been made out to be, that many of its officers were every bit as bone-headed as their much maligned British counterparts." - - American Historical Review