The Killing Of Reinhard Heydrich by Callum MacdonaldThe Killing Of Reinhard Heydrich by Callum Macdonald

The Killing Of Reinhard Heydrich

byCallum Macdonald

Paperback | August 1, 1998

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If anyone warranted assassination during World War II, that man was Reinhard Heydrich (1904-1942) -- chief of the security police, rabid anti-Semite, architect of the Final Solution, ruthless overlord of Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia, and Hitler's most likely successor. In 1941, at the height of the Nazi's seeming invincibility, the Czech government-in-exile launched a desperate operation to kill Heydrich. From the assassins' training in England to their Thermopylae-like last stand in the flooded crypt of a Prague church, and the Nazi's savage reprisals (including the obliteration of two villages), The Killing of Reinhard Heydrich brilliantly recounts one of World War II's most daring and tragic missions.
Title:The Killing Of Reinhard HeydrichFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 9.08 × 6.16 × 0.61 inPublished:August 1, 1998Publisher:DaCapo Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0306808609

ISBN - 13:9780306808609

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Operation Antropoid Explained In 2016, film enthusiasts were treated with "Anthropoid", a dramatic account of the allied assassination of Reinhard Heydrich. For those looking for an historical account of the entire operation, The Killing of Reinhard Heydrich, the SS Butcher of Prague is a must. Callum MacDonald's synthesis of the operation and its bloody ramifications brings to light the participation of Edward Benes' exiled government in partisan activities in occupied Czechoslovakia. To avoid a repeat of the Munich Agreement following the war, Benes insisted on developing a support network for partisans by insisting on training exiled military personnel in British covert activities. The book details the chronology of the operation culminating in the assassination. MacDonald asserts credit for the success lies entirely with the Czechs. If criticism can be made, it lies in the presentation of sources in the narrative. While the research is sound, readers will find themselves flipping back and forth from narrative and notes. The original edition was printed in 1989, but this narrative continues to be a relevant account twenty-eight years later.
Date published: 2017-04-30

From Our Editors

If anyone warranted assassination during World War II, that man was Reinhard Heydrich (1904-1942) -- chief of the security police, rabid anti-Semite, architect of the Final Solution, ruthless overlord of Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia, and Hitler's most likely successor. In 1941, at the height of the Nazi's seeming invincibility, the Czech government-in-exile launched a desperate operation to kill Heydrich. From the assassins' training in England to their Thermopylae-like last stand in the flooded crypt of a Prague church, and the Nazi's savage reprisals (including the obliteration of two villages), The Killing of Reinhard Heydrich brilliantly recounts one of World War II's most daring and tragic missions.