The King In Yellow by Robert W ChambersThe King In Yellow by Robert W Chambers

The King In Yellow

byRobert W ChambersEditorI.n.j. Culbard

Paperback | June 30, 2015

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The supernatural stories that make up Robert W. Chambers’s classic piece of weird fiction are tied together by a play that brings madness to all who read it: The King in Yellow. It’s a book that draws readers in with an irresistible yet innocent opening act, then drives them insane with the poisonous words of Act 2. It’s a book that cannot be suppressed, spreading like a disease from city to city, continent to continent. An influence on writers from H. P. Lovecraft to Neil Gaiman, The King in Yellow is one of the most important works of American supernatural fiction. In this dangerously unputdownable graphic-novel adaptation, I. N. J. Culbard brings to life a thrilling tale of horror that will make readers laugh and cry and tremble with fright . . . Read at your own risk.

I. N. J. Culbard is an award-winning artist widely known for his graphic adaptations of classics. He collaborated on a critically acclaimed Sherlock Holmes series withIan Edginton, as well as adapting several titles by H. P. Lovecraft. Culbard lives in England. Robert William Chambers (1865–1933) was a Brooklyn-born artist andauthor. A...
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Title:The King In YellowFormat:PaperbackDimensions:144 pages, 9.5 × 6.5 × 0.5 inPublished:June 30, 2015Publisher:Harry N. AbramsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1906838925

ISBN - 13:9781906838928

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Didn't enjoy Wasn't very engaged and gave up finishing.
Date published: 2017-05-22
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not for me Found the writer no really aloof and couldn't get into what was going on. May have to read the novel before the graphic novel?
Date published: 2017-05-22

Editorial Reviews

“A book that’s so deeply in love with language and the unseen doesn’t leave very much for an illustrator to work with. Culbard’s style is well-suited to this difficulty—it’s defined as much by what it doesn’t show as by what it does. Instead of laying on the Victorian gingerbread, Culbard creates spare, almost modernist tableaux.”