The Kingdom of God in America by H. Richard NiebuhrThe Kingdom of God in America by H. Richard Niebuhr

The Kingdom of God in America

byH. Richard Niebuhr

Paperback | October 1, 1988

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Martin Marty, in his new introduction for the Wesleyan reissue of H. Richard Niebuhr's The Kingdom of God in America, calls it "a classic." First published in 1938,

"It remains the classic reflection of the Protestant roots and ethos behind pluralistic America and its religions today." Marty notes that the new "raw and rich pluralism" that challenges the Protestant hegemony in American life has left many Protestants longing to "get back to their roots." Niebuhr's book , perhaps more than any other, identifies and describes those roots for Protestants, especially Congregationalists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Methodists, Quakers, Baptists, and Lutherans.

Introduction by Martin E. Marty.
H. RICHARD NIEBUHR was one of the most noted of American theologians. Among his books are several that are regarded as classics of American religou thought. The Kingdom of God in America, The Social sources of Denominationalism, and Christ and Culture. He was both a pastor and a scholar; he was ordained in 1916 by the Evangelical and R...
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Title:The Kingdom of God in AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:247 pages, 1 × 1 × 0.56 inPublished:October 1, 1988Publisher:Wesleyan University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:081956222X

ISBN - 13:9780819562227

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Martin Marty, in his new introduction for the Wesleyan reissue of H. Richard Niebuhr's The Kingdom of God in America, calls it "a classic." First published in 1938, "It remains the classic reflection of the Protestant roots and ethos behind pluralistic America and its religions today." Marty notes that the new "raw and rich pluralism" that challenges the Protestant hegemony in American life has left many Protestants longing to "get back to their roots." Niebuhr's book , perhaps more than any other, identifies and describes those roots for Protestants, especially Congregationalists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Methodists, Quakers, Baptists, and Lutherans.Introduction by Martin E. Marty."One of our most valuable interpretations of American religious history"