The King's Own by Captain Frederick MarryatThe King's Own by Captain Frederick Marryat

The King's Own

byCaptain Frederick Marryat

Paperback | June 4, 1999

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William Seymour grows up on shipboard in the Royal Navy, after his father is hanged during the mutiny at the Nore (1797), and later, he is impressed into the crew of a daring smuggler. This amusing and exciting novel blends in the classic true tale of an English captain who deliberately lost his frigate on a lee shore, in order to wreck a French line-of-battle ship.
Captain Frederick Marryat (1792–1848) was an actual 19th-century British naval hero who lived a saga worthy of the novels of C.S. Forester and Patrick O'Brian. He survived fifty naval battles on the crack frigate Imperieuse under Lord Cochrane—the real-life model for Horatio Hornblower and Jack Aubrey. In addition to plenty of cannonfi...
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Title:The King's OwnFormat:PaperbackDimensions:398 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 1.12 inPublished:June 4, 1999Publisher:McBooks PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0935526560

ISBN - 13:9780935526561

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Customer Reviews of The King's Own

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From Our Editors

When an orphan grows up shipboard in the Royal Navy, he is wise beyond his years. That’s why it is surprising a daring smuggler impresses our young hero into his crew. In The King’s Own, find out what happens when evil masks itself to wreak havoc on all of England.

Editorial Reviews

" Marryat's writing . . . is also absorbing and delightful."  —J. S. Bratton, The Novel to 1900