The Land of Lost Content: Children and Childhood in Nineteenth-Century French Literature

Hardcover | July 1, 1993

byRosemary Lloyd

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The Land of Lost Content explores the ways in which nineteenth-century French writers represented childhood and children in their work. Rosemary Lloyd considers poetry, fiction, autobiographies, and letters to trace the ways in which a range of writers gradually responded to changing conceptsof the self. After a study of central problems and recurrent motifs encountered in autobiography, a chronological survey of fictional texts shows the development of a series of myths of childhood successively debunked by later writers, who in turn create their own myths. Further chapters exploresuch central themes as reading, nature, and school, and examine the evolution of a literature in which the child becomes the main protagonist, as well as addressing the question of whether the child figure is merely used as a reductive stereotype. This is the first study of childhood innineteenth-century France to range from autobiography through major fiction to works for children, and to use as its primary focus the narratological difficulties of recreating childhood.

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From Our Editors

The Land of Lost Content explores the ways in which nineteenth-century French writers represented childhood and children in their work. Ranging widely through poetry, fiction, autobiographies, and letters, Rosemary Lloyd shows how writers as diverse as Baudelaire and Hector Malot, George Sand and Pierre Loti, Flaubert and Judith Gautie...

From the Publisher

The Land of Lost Content explores the ways in which nineteenth-century French writers represented childhood and children in their work. Rosemary Lloyd considers poetry, fiction, autobiographies, and letters to trace the ways in which a range of writers gradually responded to changing conceptsof the self. After a study of central prob...

From the Jacket

The Land of Lost Content explores the ways in which nineteenth-century French writers represented childhood and children in their work. Ranging widely through poetry, fiction, autobiographies, and letters, Rosemary Lloyd shows how writers as diverse as Baudelaire and Hector Malot, George Sand and Pierre Loti, Flaubert and Judith Gautie...

Rosemary Lloyd is at Indiana University.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:286 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.87 inPublished:July 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019815173X

ISBN - 13:9780198151739

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From Our Editors

The Land of Lost Content explores the ways in which nineteenth-century French writers represented childhood and children in their work. Ranging widely through poetry, fiction, autobiographies, and letters, Rosemary Lloyd shows how writers as diverse as Baudelaire and Hector Malot, George Sand and Pierre Loti, Flaubert and Judith Gautier, gradually responded to changing concepts of the self. After a study of the problems and motifs which recur in autobiography, a chronological survey of fictional texts shows the development of a series of myths of childhood, successively debunked by later writers who in turn create their own myths. Rosemary Lloyd goes on to explore such central themes as reading, nature, and school. She examines the evolution of a literature in which the child becomes the main protagonist, and also addresses the question of whether the child figure is merely used as a reductive stereotype. This is the first study of childhood in nineteenth-century France to encompass autobiography, major fiction, and works for children, and to use as its primary fo

Editorial Reviews

'Rosemary Lloyd's Land of Lost Content is a sinteresting for the questions it raises and the themes it suggests as for the light it throws on the 'long' eighteenth century.'Mitzi Myers. University of California, Los Angeles. Eighteenth-century Fiction. 6:3