The Language of the News by Martin ConboyThe Language of the News by Martin Conboy

The Language of the News

byMartin ConboyEditorMartin Conboy

Paperback | June 20, 2007

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The Language of the Newsinvestigates and critiques the conventions of language used in newspapers and provides students with a clear introduction to critical linguistics as a tool for analysis.

Using contemporary examples from UK, USA and Australian newspapers, this book deals with key themes of representation ¿ from gender and national identity to ¿race¿¿ and looks at how language is used to construct audiences, to persuade, and even to parody. It examines debates in the newspapers themselves about the nature of language including commentary on political correctness, the sensitive use of language and irony as a journalistic weapon.

Featuring chapter openings and summaries, activities, and a wealth of examples from contemporary news coverage (including examples from television and radio),The Language of the News broadens the perceptions of the use of language in the news media and is essential reading for students of media and communication, journalism, and English language and linguistics.

Title:The Language of the NewsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.6 inPublished:June 20, 2007Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:041537202X

ISBN - 13:9780415372022

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Table of Contents

1. Language and Society  2. The Development of Newspaper Language  3. Contemporary Newspaper Language  4. Newspapers as Interpretative Communities  5. Language Content and Structure  6. Headlines  7. Stories  8. Objectivity  9. Summary

Editorial Reviews

"This book is an important addition to research in the area of critical
linguistic analysis of media discourse in general, and news language in
particular." -- Linguist List, 2008