The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine by Robert PaddleThe Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine by Robert Paddle

The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine

byRobert Paddle

Paperback | December 9, 2002

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This insightful examination of the history and extinction of one of Australia's most enduring folkloric beasts--the thylacine, (or Tasmanian tiger)-- challenges conventional theories. It argues that rural politicians, ineffective political action by scientists, and a deeper intellectual prejudice about the inferiority of marsupials actually resulted in the extinction of this once proud species. Hb ISBN (2000):0-521-78219-8
Title:The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the ThylacineFormat:PaperbackDimensions:284 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:December 9, 2002Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521531543

ISBN - 13:9780521531542

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: science and the species from a European perspective; 2. Constructing objectivity: changing scientific perceptions of the thylacine; 3. Of signal importance: select social and predatory behaviours; 4. A predatory entertainment: stimuli of consuming interest; 5. Ovisceral exploitation: extracts of sheepish behaviour; 6. Mythology becomes misology: the dogmatism of unenlightenment; 7. Faunal fun and games: the politics of protection; 8. The last Tasmanian tiger: indifference and the demise of the species; 9. Post-extinction blues: contingency and responsibility in extinction; 10. Conclusion: the lessons to be learnt.

Editorial Reviews

"It is a fascinating blend of meticulous scholarship and barely suppressed fury... the book achieves a rich and plausible picture of the Thylacines' natural and unnatural history... The author builds a compelling case." William B. Sherwin, Quarterly Review of Biology