The Law of Obligations: Roman Foundations of the Civilian Tradition

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byReinhard Zimmermann

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This book is widely regarded as one of the most remarkable achievements in Roman Law and Comparative Law scholarship this century - a fact attested to by the universal acclaim with which it has been received throughout Europe, America, and beyond. As a work of Roman Law scholarship it fusesthe vast volume of 20th century scholarship on the Roman law of obligations into a clear and very readable (and in many ways original) account of the law. As a work of comparative law it traces the transformation of the Roman law of obligations over the centuries into what is now modern German,English and South African law, presenting the reader with a contrast between these legal systems which is unique both in its scope and its depth. As a whole the book is written with a deep understanding of human nature and of many social, economic, and other forces that determine the face of thelaw.

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This book is widely regarded as one of the most remarkable achievements in Roman Law and Comparative Law scholarship this century - a fact attested to by the universal acclaim with which it has been received throughout Europe, America, and beyond. As a work of Roman Law scholarship it fusesthe vast volume of 20th century scholarship on...

Reinhard Zimmermann is at University of Regensburg.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:1312 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 2.05 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019876426X

ISBN - 13:9780198764267

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'Reinhard Zimmermann's study of the Roman law of obligations has been justly praised, and it is now well known, not only for its intrinsic excellence, but also for the manner in which it has opened up a dialogue between lawyers of the Civilian and Common law traditions...The book is indeed themost extraordinary tour de force of erudition lucidly expounded. The publication of the paperback edition at a reasonable price is thus to be welcomed...stimulating and thought-provoking...Oxford University Press is to be congratulated in publishing a translation of one and a relatively inexpensiveedition of the other. Both are important books.'