The Legend Of Light by Bob Hicok

The Legend Of Light

byBob Hicok

Paperback | September 15, 1995

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Whether Hicok is considering the reflection of human faces in the Vietnam War Memorial or the elements of a “Modern Prototype” factory, he prompts an icy realization that we may have never seen the world as it truly is. But his resilient voice and consistent perspective is neither blaming nor didactic, and ultimately enlightening. From the shadowed corners into which we dare not look clearly, Hicok makes us witness and hero of The Legend of Light.

About The Author

Bob Hicok is the author of another collection of poems, Bearing Witness. He lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he is an automotive die designer and computer system administrator. His poetry has appeared in many literary publications, including Boulevard, The Iowa Review, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, and The S...
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Details & Specs

Title:The Legend Of LightFormat:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.4 inPublished:September 15, 1995Publisher:University Of Wisconsin Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299149145

ISBN - 13:9780299149147

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“Bob Hicok’s poems go out ‘looking for what’s least,’ but they also keep their eye, in these failing days of our century, on the large view, ‘The term used / is megalopolis.’ This vast expanse is his terrain, and the subject he ably studies there is—us, it turns out; or what he calls the ‘heart’s jazz.’ He listens to that music most industriously.”—Albert Goldbarth