The Liberty Line: The Legend of the Underground Railroad by Larry GaraThe Liberty Line: The Legend of the Underground Railroad by Larry Gara

The Liberty Line: The Legend of the Underground Railroad

byLarry Gara

Paperback | January 4, 1996

Pricing and Purchase Info

$29.24 online 
$31.25 list price save 6%
Earn 146 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

" The underground railroad -- with its mysterious signals, secret depots, abolitionist heroes, and slave-hunting villains -- has become part of American mythology. But legend has distorted much of this history. Larry Gara shows how pre-Civil War partisan propanda, postwar remininscences by fame-hungry abolitionists, and oral tradition helped foster the popular belief that a powerful secret organization spirited floods of slaves away from the South. In contrast to much popular belief, however, the slaves themselves had active roles in their own escape. They carried out their runs, receiving aid only after they had reached territory where they still faced return. The Liberty Line puts slaves in their rightful position: the center of their struggle for freedom.

Title:The Liberty Line: The Legend of the Underground RailroadFormat:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 8.51 × 5.54 × 0.55 inPublished:January 4, 1996Publisher:University Press of Kentucky

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0813108640

ISBN - 13:9780813108643

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

The underground railroad - with its mysterious signals, secret depots, abolitionist heroes, and slave-hunting villains - has become part of American mythology. But legend has distorted much of the history of this institution, which Larry Gara carefully investigates in this important study. Gara show how pre-Civil War partisan propaganda, postwar reminiscences by fame-hungry abolitionists, and oral tradition helped foster the popular belief that a powerful secret organization spirited floods of slaves away from the South. In contrast to that legend, the slaves themselves had active roles in their own escapes from slave states. They carried out their runs to the North, receiving aid only after they had reached territory where they still faced return under the Fugitive Slave Law. Thus, The Liberty Line places fugitive slaves in their rightful position: the center of their struggle for freedom.