The Limits of Eroticism in Post-Petrarchan Narrative: Conditional Pleasure from Spenser to Marvell by Dorothy StephensThe Limits of Eroticism in Post-Petrarchan Narrative: Conditional Pleasure from Spenser to Marvell by Dorothy Stephens

The Limits of Eroticism in Post-Petrarchan Narrative: Conditional Pleasure from Spenser to Marvell

byDorothy Stephens

Paperback | December 14, 2006

Pricing and Purchase Info

$68.64

Earn 343 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The poet Petrarch imagined that the hopeless but pure love of a woman could lead a man to heaven. In sixteenth-century England Edmund Spenser wrote poetry in the petrarchan tradition while heightening its dilemmas--flirting with a very different kind of feminine image. Dorothy Stephens shows that this flirtation emerges only in conditional language and situations, and that the eroticism the reader feels often belies a narrator's insistence that it is illusory. She goes on to look at responses to Spenser's eroticism among male and female writers in the seventeenth century.
Title:The Limits of Eroticism in Post-Petrarchan Narrative: Conditional Pleasure from Spenser to MarvellFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:December 14, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521034698

ISBN - 13:9780521034692

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Limits of Eroticism in Post-Petrarchan Narrative: Conditional Pleasure from Spenser to Marvell

Reviews

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I. Spenser: 1. Into other arms: Amoret's evasion; 2. 'Newes of devils': feminine sprights in masculine minds; 3. Monstrous intimacy and arrested developments; 4. Narrative flirtations; Part II. Seventeenth-Century Refigurations: 5. 'Who can those vast imaginations feed?': The Concealed Fancies and the price of hunger; 6. Caught in the act at Nun Appleton; Afterword; Notes; Works cited; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Waht the superficial glance misses...this book delights to reveal." Journal of English and Germanic Philology