The Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, and the Making of the Alberta-Montana Borderlands by Sheila McManusThe Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, and the Making of the Alberta-Montana Borderlands by Sheila McManus

The Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, and the Making of the Alberta-Montana Borderlands

bySheila McManus

Paperback | May 1, 2005

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Nations are made and unmade at their borders, and for the United States and Canada in the late nineteenth century, the forty-ninth parallel was a key site for this process in the West. Governments on both sides wanted the border to be a clear and unequivocal dividing line between the two nations, both under process of construction. Both Canadian and U.S. officials also wanted the border to reinforce the unique spatial, racial, and gender categories that would distinguish the two nations. Along the Alberta-Montana border, the transition from Blackfoot country to borderlands in the late nineteenth century did not follow the path scripted for them by government officials. Rather, cross-border traffic by Kainah, Piikuni, and Siksika Blackfoot peoples as well as railroads, immigrants, and local farmers continually challenged the legitimacy and effectiveness of the line. The growth of a white female population in the region, which should have "whitened" and "easternized" the region, merely served to complicate emerging categories. In The Line Which Separates, Sheila McManus reveals the ways in which gender, race, and national identity fought a complex battle that bifurcated and divided a previously indigenously conceived, cohesive region along international models.
Sheila McManus is Associate Professor of History at the University of Lethbridge in southern Alberta. Her book, The Line Which Separates, was co-published by the University of Nebraska Press and The University of Alberta Press in 2005. Currently, she is writing a textbook on women in the U.S. West.
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Title:The Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, and the Making of the Alberta-Montana BorderlandsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:300 pages, 8.95 × 6.01 × 0.53 inPublished:May 1, 2005Publisher:University Of Nebraska PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0888644345

ISBN - 13:9780888644343

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Editorial Reviews

"Sheila McManus seeks to understand how the running of the 49th parallel, which constitutes the boundary between two nations (Canada and the United States) as well as a province and a state (Alberta and Montana), played out, insofar as it was part of a policy designed to nationalize a unified geographical region occupied by a common cultural group, the Blackfoot Confederacy. As the subtitle indicates, McManus filters the elements making up the stuff of the Alberta-Montana borderlands through two historical membranes: race and gender. The book isolates and examines several problems faced by the national governments in their attempts to divide and nationalize a common topographical, economic, social, and linguistic space.. This is one of an increasing number of border studies that, by employing the techniques of comparative history and knowledge of gendered relationships, have illuminated the inner recesses of Canadian-American relations, revealing subtleties and complexities unknown to traditional students of the field." John R. Abbott, Canadian Book Review Annual 2007