The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form by Frans De BruynThe Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form by Frans De Bruyn

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form

byFrans De Bruyn

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke brings a literary perspective to bear upon Edmund Burke's political writings. Burke understood himself to be a `literary' writer, a claim that held a much greater cultural and political significance in his time than it does in our own. This studyrecontextualizes Burke's writings by exploring what the eighteenth century understood by the term `literature' and by demonstrating how thoroughly he relies on the dominant literary discourses of his time, especially the satire and georgic/didactic modes, in composing his speeches and polemics.From his debt to the Scriblerian satire of Pope and swift to his extensive use of the theatrical metaphor and his forays into the fields of gothic romance, tragedy, and epic, De Bruyn argues that the literary forms Burke uses are instrinsic and indispensable elements in the meanings of his texts,both for himself and for his audience.

About The Author

Frans De Bruyn is at University of Ottawa.

Details & Specs

Title:The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary FormFormat:HardcoverDimensions:332 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.91 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198121822

ISBN - 13:9780198121824

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`Among the many virtues of this fine, clearly-written book is its variety. De Bruyn has new light to throw on Burke's Miltonic and biblical sublime ... Much of the excellence of The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke comes from the author's refusal to oversimplify. He is alert to Burke's owncontradictions and complexities and never forces texts into a single generic framework ... He succeeds not just in presenting a more historicized Burke to literary critics, but also in offering a more subtly, and self-consciously, literary one to historians ... If Romanticism starts with Burke andBurke's reaction to the French Revolution, De Bruyn shows us that we can comprehend neither without the thorough understanding of eighteenth-century contexts that this book will help us to achieve.'Tim Fulford, Nottingham Trent University, Romantic Circles, Dec 1998