The Literature of Misogyny in Medieval Spain: The Arcipreste de Talavera and the Spill by Michael SolomonThe Literature of Misogyny in Medieval Spain: The Arcipreste de Talavera and the Spill by Michael Solomon

The Literature of Misogyny in Medieval Spain: The Arcipreste de Talavera and the Spill

byMichael Solomon

Paperback | August 5, 2010

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The Literature of Misogyny in Medieval Spain examines the medical underpinnings of two major misogynist works from the 15th-century Iberian: Alonso de Martínez's Arcipreste de Talavera and Jacme Roig's Spill. Michael Solomon argues that these works gain their persuasive force by linking concerns over health and illness with men's behavior toward women. Solomon shows how the demonization of women in medieval society was more than vaguely cultural; it was a legitimate aspect of the healing arts, considered vital to the well-being of men.

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Title:The Literature of Misogyny in Medieval Spain: The Arcipreste de Talavera and the SpillFormat:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:August 5, 2010Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052115278X

ISBN - 13:9780521152785

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction: the preacher and the physician; Part I. Disease and the Medieval Clinic: 1. Disease, discourse, and illness: the structure of healing in late medieval Spain; 2. Sexual pathology and the etiology of lovesickness; Part II. The Arcipreste de Talavera and the Spill: 3. The poetics of infection; 4. The poetics of the compendium and the conditions of the clinic; 5. The tortured body and the abjectified voice: additional therapeutic strategies; Part III. The Triumph of the Clinic: 6. Women, the power to disease and the fictions of the counter-clinic; Notes; Works cited; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"One can only hope that other contemporary texts will find the same lucid attention that Solomon allots to these two." Elizabeth Rhodes, Speculuma Journal of Medieval Studies