The Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective Thinking by Brandon RoyalThe Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective Thinking by Brandon Royal

The Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective Thinking

byBrandon RoyalContribution byGeorge FosterEditorJonathan K Cohen

Paperback | March 15, 2010

Pricing and Purchase Info

$18.50 online 
$19.50 list price save 5%
Earn 93 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

This guidebook addresses one of the most critical yet seldom taught skills. Reasoning skills help us make sense of the world, including how to better make decisions, tackle opportunities, evaluate claims, and solve problems. Interwoven within the book's five sections - Perception & Mindset, Decision Making, Creative Thinking, Analyzing Arguments, and Mastering Logic - reader's will discover 50 reasoning tips that summarize the common themes behind classic reasoning problems and situations. Appendixes contain summaries of fallacious reasoning, analogies, trade-offs, and a review of critical reading skills. A wealth of examples, charts, and insightful problems makes The Little Blue Reasoning Book an invaluable guide for any individual wanting to further sharpen his or her thinking skills.

Enjoy the benefits of your own self-paced reasoning course:
*Gain insights into the four classic mindsets and how each influences one's outlook.
*Make better decisions by framing problems with quantitative tools.
*Employ creative thinking to bypass "roadblocks" and unlock novel solutions.
*Evaluate claims by challenging the strength of key assumptions.
*Use logic to break down arguments in a clear, easy-to-understand manner.
*Review the 10 classic trade-offs to speed recognition of core issues.
*Read with added clarity, whether your goal involves pleasure or profit.

Author's bio: Brandon Royal is an award-winning writer whose educational authorship includes The Little Red Writing Book, The Little Gold Grammar Book, and The Little Green Math Book. He continues to write and publish in the belief that there will always be a place for books that inspire, enlighten, and enrich.

"A wonderful work that shows how reasoning is challenging, yet engaging, rewarding and fun. Because reasoning involves people, it is an art as well as a science. And to remind ourselves just why it's not always easy to mix the two, we owe a cheerful salute to Nobel prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann who observed: 'Think how hard physics would be if particles could think.'"
-Dr. William A. McEachern, author, award-winning teacher, and founding editor of The Teaching Economist

Brandon Royal is an award-winning author whose educational authorship includes The Little Red Writing Book, The Little Gold Grammar Book, The Little Green Math Book, and The Little Blue Reasoning Book. During his tenure working in Hong Kong for US-based Kaplan Educational Centers (a Washington Post subsidiary and the largest test-prepa...
Title:The Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective ThinkingFormat:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.62 inPublished:March 15, 2010Publisher:Maven PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1897393601

ISBN - 13:9781897393604

Customer Reviews of The Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective Thinking

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from An excellent option for anyone who thinks or wants to This is the kind of book I wish I had in high school. No one teaches the art of thinking but every once in a while we have to give our brains a tune-up. One of my favorite topics is how the four classic mindsets influence how we view the world. I love how this single problem says so much about the way we think and how every answer choice is both right and wrong. Take the following excerpt for example: Which of the following five sports is least like the other four? A) Baseball B) Cricket C) Soccer (Football) D) Golf E) Ice Hockey This is indeed an interesting question highlighting the possibility of multiple solutions and subjective interpretations. Not only would such a question never be chosen for an IQ test, but it also hints at ambiguity so often present whenever individuals make choices. Most people find themselves choosing choice D insofar as golf is primarily an individual sport while the other sports are team sports. Golf is also the only sport here in which a lower score beats a higher score. Some pontificate whether the distinction rests on the degree to which golf is more mental than physical while the other four sports are more physical than mental. Certainly physical speed is of obvious importance in all sports except golf. Choice E is likely the next most popular answer. Ice hockey is essentially a winter sport, whereas the other sports are typically played in warmer weather. In ice hockey, players use skates, whereas in the other sports players use sporting shoes. Ice hockey is also played with a puck, the others, with balls! (Pun intended ‹ ice hockey is notorious for being one of the roughest of sports and the only one listed above where you can legitimately ³check² another player.) A number of people view soccer (football) as least like the other three. After all, the other sports are played with stick-like objects: golf requires clubs, irons, and putters; ice hockey requires sticks, and baseball and cricket require bats. Football (soccer) also is played with an air-filled object, not a solid ball or puck. People who choose choice A point to the fact that baseball has no true world championship ‹ the ³World Series² is an American phenomenon. Choice B (cricket) represents a sport that is played primarily in Commonwealth countries. Every answer choice is both right and wrong! In summary, there are at least four distinct ways in which individuals draw broad contrasts among these different sports. Some people tend to focus first on the number of people who play the sport (individual vs. team sport), some focus on the speed with which each sport is played (walking vs. running), some focus on the objects used to play the sport (puck vs. ball, inflatable object vs. non-inflatable object, stick-like object vs. non-stick-like object), while others see these sports in the context of when (winter vs. summer, cold weather vs. warm weather) or where they are played (within a particular country or region). In terms of thinking about how different people think, it is useful to massage the concept of ³mindset.² Many schemas exist which seek to classify mindsets. For instance, if we were to spend time reviewing how various people choose an answer to the above multiple-choice question, we might find the following: some people are more analytical, some more holistic, some are more results-oriented, and some are more process-oriented. Case in point: People who are analytically minded tend to focus on the instruments used to play the sport. People who are holistically minded tend to see the sport in terms of when and where (i.e., geography) it is played. People who are results-oriented are more likely to see the end result, contrasting the desirable low scores in golf with the desirable high scores in the other four sports. Process-oriented individuals will likely see contrasts in the number of players who play each sport, their physical size, and their athletic movements.
Date published: 2010-12-31

Editorial Reviews

A wonderful work that shows how reasoning is challenging, yet engaging, rewarding and fun. Because reasoning involves people, it is an art as well as a science. And to remind ourselves just why it’s not always easy to mix the two, we owe a cheerful salute to Nobel prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann who observed:  Think how hard physics would be if particles could think. —Dr. William A. McEachern, author, award-winning teacher, and founding editor of The Teaching Economist