The Little Magazine In Contemporary America

Paperback | April 10, 2015

EditorIan Morris, Joanne Diaz

not yet rated|write a review
Little magazines have often showcased the best new writing in America. Historically, these idiosyncratic, small-circulation outlets have served the dual functions of representing the avant-garde of literary expression while also helping many emerging writers become established authors. Although changing technology and the increasingly harsh financial realities of publishing over the past three decades would seem to have pushed little magazines to the brink of extinction, their story is far more complicated.

In this collection, Ian Morris and Joanne Diaz gather the reflections of twenty-three prominent editors whose little magazines have flourished over the past thirty-five years. Highlighting the creativity and innovation driving this diverse and still vital medium, contributors offer insights into how their publications sometimes succeeded, sometimes reluctantly folded, but mostly how they evolved and persevered. Other topics discussed include the role of little magazines in promoting the work and concerns of minority and women writers, the place of universities in supporting and shaping little magazines, and the online and offline future of these publications.

Selected contributors
Betsy Sussler, BOMB; Lee Gutkind, Creative Nonfiction; Bruce Andrews, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E; Dave Eggers, McSweeney’s; Keith Gessen, n+1; Don Share, Poetry; Jane Friedman, VQR; Amy Hoffman, Women’s Review of Books; and more.
 

Pricing and Purchase Info

$37.67

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Little magazines have often showcased the best new writing in America. Historically, these idiosyncratic, small-circulation outlets have served the dual functions of representing the avant-garde of literary expression while also helping many emerging writers become established authors. Although changing technology and the increasingly ...

Ian Morris has taught courses on literature, writing, and publishing at Lake Forest College and Columbia College. He was managing editor of TriQuarterly magazine for over a decade and is the founding editor of Fifth Star Press and the author of the novel When Bad Things Happen to Rich People. Joanne Diaz is associate professor of Engli...

other books by Ian Morris

The Greeks: History, Culture, and Society
The Greeks: History, Culture, and Society

Paperback|Jun 25 2009

$125.33 online$137.90list price(save 9%)
Why The West Rules - For Now: The Patterns Of History, And What They Reveal About The Future
Why The West Rules - For Now: The Patterns Of History, ...

Paperback|Dec 6 2011

$22.62 online$29.99list price(save 24%)
Xerxes: King Of Kings: The True Story
Xerxes: King Of Kings: The True Story

Hardcover|May 31 2017

$35.62 online$45.50list price(save 21%)
see all books by Ian Morris
Format:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.7 inPublished:April 10, 2015Publisher:University Of Chicago PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:022612049X

ISBN - 13:9780226120492

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Little Magazine In Contemporary America

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

“It’s been thirty-five years since the last comprehensive examination of little magazines, during which time the advent of the Internet and evolving publishing constrictions have presented unique challenges to these little engines that could. Morris and Diaz’s anthology…addresses these challenges and the ways in which many little magazines have turned them into advantages, including the opportunity for more and specialized promotion and differentiation. Public discussion and debate is essential to literary and artistic work, and these essays speak to the opportunity for this collective conversation to reach a wider audience in the digital age. The Little Magazine in Contemporary America is a welcome and compelling update, one that offers substantive hope for the future and continued significance of its subject.”