The Logbooks: Connecticut's Slave Ships and Human Memory by Anne FarrowThe Logbooks: Connecticut's Slave Ships and Human Memory by Anne Farrow

The Logbooks: Connecticut's Slave Ships and Human Memory

byAnne Farrow

Paperback | June 7, 2016

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about

Three long-neglected logbooks from Connecticut’s slave trade raise questions about memory and collective forgetting
ANNE FARROW is coauthor of the bestseller Complicity: How the North Promoted, Prolonged and Profited from Slavery. She lives in Haddam, Connecticut.
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Title:The Logbooks: Connecticut's Slave Ships and Human MemoryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:June 7, 2016Publisher:Wesleyan University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0819576441

ISBN - 13:9780819576446

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface
RECOVERING THE STORY
Cleared for Africa
Shadows on the Wall
Creating a Record
“How Did You Find Me?”
THE HAUNTED LAND
Meeting the Slave Traders
Another Century, Not My Own
The Past in Dreams
History for an Abandoned Place
The Screaming Man
The Story of a Stone
The Slaughterhouse
TROUBLE IN MIND
A Book with Many Bookmarks
A Platform for Memory
The Pain That Survives
The Fragile Power
History That Won’t End
A HISTORY THAT DOESN’T “FIT”
Back to Africa
To Live in Peril on the Sea
Not a Word but a World
The Slave Trade’s Men in Full
SEPARATIONS
A Visit to Madina
This Far, and No Further
Legacy
Lost and Found
Our Choice Is the Truth or Nothing
Afterword
Acknowledgments
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Reading Guide

Editorial Reviews

“In this rich, rewarding, and ultimately redemptive book, Anne Farrow invites us to explore the connections between the past and the present, who we are and what we remember. Perhaps no historian has done more to unearth the profound, often forgotten ways in which slavery shaped New England’s history.”—John Wood Sweet, Connecticut History Review