The Logic of Evil: The Social Origins of the Nazi Party, 1925-1933 by William BrusteinThe Logic of Evil: The Social Origins of the Nazi Party, 1925-1933 by William Brustein

The Logic of Evil: The Social Origins of the Nazi Party, 1925-1933

byWilliam Brustein

Paperback | March 30, 1998

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Why did millions of apparently sane, rational Germans join the Nazi Party between 1925 and 1933? In this provocative book, William Brustein argues that the Nazi Party's emergence as the most popular political party in Germany was eminently logical—that it resulted largely from its success at fashioning economic programs that addressed the material needs of a wide range of German citizens.

Brustein has carefully analyzed a huge collection of pre-1933 Nazi Party membership data drawn from the official files at the Berlin Document Center. He argues that Nazi followers were more representative of German society as a whole—that they included more workers, more single women, and more Catholics—than most previous scholars have believed. Further, says Brustein, the patterns of membership reveal that people joined the Nazi Party not because of Hitler's irrational appeal or charisma or anti-Semitism, but because the party, through its shrewd and proactive program, offered more benefits to more people than did the other political parties in Weimar Germany. According to Brustein, Nazi supporters were no different from citizens anywhere who select a political party or candidate they believe will promote their economic interests. The roots of evil, he suggests, may be ordinary indeed.
Title:The Logic of Evil: The Social Origins of the Nazi Party, 1925-1933Format:PaperbackDimensions:235 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.57 inPublished:March 30, 1998Publisher:Yale University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300074328

ISBN - 13:9780300074321

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Why did millions of apparently sane, rational Germans join the Nazi Party, between 1925 and 1933? In this provocative book, William Brustein argues that Nazi supporters were no different from citizens anywhere who select a political party or candidate they believe will promote their economic interests. The roots of evil, he suggests, may be ordinary indeed."A fascinating story of how ordinary Germans joined an extraordinary party for ordinary reasons.... Brustein has written an important book. The database is impressive, the theory is provocative, and the conclusions are scary". -- Jeffrey Kopstein, American Political Science Review"An important book on the social origins of the Nazi Party from 1925 to 1933.... Its conclusions are significant". -- Richard J. Evans, Jewish Chronicle"The most useful part of this book is the group of chapters in which the author analyzes the material interests of different classes and the responses of the various Weimar parties". -- Stanley Hoffmann, Foreign Affairs"The Logic of Evil ...is destined to become an important