The Long Exile: A true story of deception and survival amongst the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic

Kobo ebook | April 3, 2009

byMelanie McGrath

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A chilling true story of deception and survival set amidst the Inuit communities of the Canadian Arctic. In 1922 the Irish-American explorer Robert Flaherty made a film called ‘Nanook of the North’ which captured the world's imagination. Soon afterwards, he quit the Arctic for good, leaving behind his bastard son, Joseph, to grow up Eskimo. Thirty years later a young, inexperienced policeman, Ross Gibson, was asked by the Canadian government to draw up a list of Inuit who were to be resettled in the uninhabited polar Arctic and left to fend as best they could. Joseph Flaherty and his family were on that list. They were told they were going to an Arctic Eden of spring flowers and polar bears. But it didn't turn out that way, and this, Joseph Flaherty's story, tells how it did.

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A chilling true story of deception and survival set amidst the Inuit communities of the Canadian Arctic. In 1922 the Irish-American explorer Robert Flaherty made a film called ‘Nanook of the North’ which captured the world's imagination. Soon afterwards, he quit the Arctic for good, leaving behind his bastard son, Joseph, to grow up Es...

Format:Kobo ebookPublished:April 3, 2009Publisher:HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERSLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0007323395

ISBN - 13:9780007323395

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Customer Reviews of The Long Exile: A true story of deception and survival amongst the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic

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Rated 1 out of 5 by from Disappointing and tedious "The Long Exile" is supposedly an account of the relocation of several Inuit families from their home at the edge of the Hudson Bay to Ellsmere Island, in the far north of Canada. However, the book devotes considerable space, also, to the life of Robert Flaherty, the man who made the acclaimed film "Nanook of the North". Trying to tease out the actual details of the relocation and the subsequent life of the Inuit in the high Arctic requires patience and dedication, as the author's tricks and inventions, inserted in an attempt to "flesh out" the account, are almost enough to cause even the most interested reader to close the book and give up. Examples abound of accounts of events into which the author adds details such as (my examples, made up to indicate the general style) "the sun was just peeking out of the clouds, and the cry of the seagulls could be heard overhead, as the boat left the shore." Give me a break. If the author had simply recounted the facts, as she was able to uncover them, this would have made a noteworthy historical account of a tragic event in Canadian history. As it is, this narrative is mired in a hopeless barrage of poorly written fluff, which adds nothing but frustration for the reader.
Date published: 2008-01-20
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Disappointing and tedious "The Long Exile" is supposedly an account of the relocation of several Inuit families from their home at the edge of the Hudson Bay to Ellsmere Island, in the far north of Canada. However, the book devotes considerable space, also, to the life of Robert Flaherty, the man who made the acclaimed film "Nanook of the North". Trying to tease out the actual details of the relocation and the subsequent life of the Inuit in the high Arctic requires patience and dedication, as the author's tricks and inventions, inserted in an attempt to "flesh out" the account, are almost enough to cause even the most interested reader to close the book and give up. Examples abound of accounts of events into which the author adds details such as (my examples, made up to indicate the general style) "the sun was just peeking out of the clouds, and the cry of the seagulls could be heard overhead, as the boat left the shore." Give me a break. If the author had simply recounted the facts, as she was able to uncover them, this would have made a noteworthy historical account of a tragic event in Canadian history. As it is, this narrative is mired in a hopeless barrage of poorly written fluff, which adds nothing but frustration for the reader.
Date published: 2008-01-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Good But Missed Opportunity The story told is true and well presented. It is 300 pages of very detailed and important information for all Canadians and human rights advocates around the world. This book is an important story for all Canadians. The story tells me that we Canadians were and are subtle racists less open to the eyes of the world. The missed opportunity is the reference to Resolute Bay and the racist abuse of the local Inuit by the use of alcohol and other methods to subdue Inuit women for sex. It is a book of 300 pages but only devotes a couple to the rape and abuse of Canadians. The book could also use a liberal dose of spellcheck. Thanks Al
Date published: 2006-12-01