The Magic Mirror: Law in American History

Paperback | June 15, 2008

byKermit L. Hall

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Now in a new edition with extensive updates by Peter Karsten, The Magic Mirror chronicles American law from its English origins to the present. It offers comprehensive treatment of twentieth-century developments and sets American law and legal institutions in the broad context of social,economic, and political events, weaving together themes from the history of both constitutional and private law. This edition of The Magic Mirror features additional coverage of resistance to law through U.S. history, the customary law of self-governing bodies, and Native Americans. It also hasupdated coverage for law in society, the legal implications of social change in areas such as criminal justice, the rights of women, blacks, the family, and children. It further examines regional differences in American legal culture, the creation of the administrative and security states, thedevelopment of American federalism, and the rise of the legal profession. The Magic Mirror pays close attention to the evolution of substantive law categories--such as contracts, torts, negotiable instruments, real property, trusts and estates, and civil procedure--and addresses the intellectualevolution of American law, surveying movements such as legal realism and critical legal studies. The authors conclude that over its history American law has been remarkably fluid, adapting in form and substance to each successive generation without ever fully resolving the underlying social andeconomic conflicts that first provoke demands for legal change.

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Now in a new edition with extensive updates by Peter Karsten, The Magic Mirror chronicles American law from its English origins to the present. It offers comprehensive treatment of twentieth-century developments and sets American law and legal institutions in the broad context of social,economic, and political events, weaving together ...

Kermit Hall is a Professor of History and Law at the University of Tulsa.

other books by Kermit L. Hall

Institutions of American Democracy
Institutions of American Democracy

Kobo ebook|Oct 27 2005

$30.09 online$38.99list price(save 22%)
see all books by Kermit L. Hall
Format:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 2 inPublished:June 15, 2008Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195081803

ISBN - 13:9780195081800

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"How to make an excellent book even better? Oxford University Press and Peter Karsten have found the prefect way. Karsten has improved upon Kermit Hall's fine American legal history textbook, The Magic Mirror (1989), by adding to the second edition mini-essays on customary and local law, new materials about alternative dispute resolution, and the latest scholarship on Native American law, immigration law, and popular resistance to law enforcement. Now fully up to date, but still as readable and teachable as ever, the second edition of The Magic Mirror will please both teachers and students."--Peter Charles Hoffer, University of Georgia "Peter Karsten has added depth of explanation, new scholarship, and expert editorial crafting to the superb work of Kermit Hall. This new edition gives students far more understandable insights into American legal history and grounds historical interpretation in primary sources and thoughtful scholarship."--Gordon Morris Bakken, California State University, Fullerton "Peter Karsten has judiciously revised the late Kermit Hall's Magic Mirror to incorporate the best scholarship of the past two decades and to bring the book's coverage up to date, without sacrificing the brevity or the lucidity of the original. This new edition will be welcomed by teachers of undergraduate and graduate courses, and indeed by anyone who wants to read a short survey of American legal history."--Stuart Benner, UCLA