The Mansions Of The Gods

Paperback | October 28, 2004

byRENÉ GOSCINNY, Albert Uderzo

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Why not infiltrate the little Gaulish village by building a modern housing estate? That's the plan thought up by trendy Roman architect Squaronthehypotenus to help Caesar crush the indomitable Gauls. Will the villagers be tempted by the chance of making money when the first Roman tenants move in? And what about the Gauls' secret weapon. Roll up to see the Roman remains!

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Why not infiltrate the little Gaulish village by building a modern housing estate? That's the plan thought up by trendy Roman architect Squaronthehypotenus to help Caesar crush the indomitable Gauls. Will the villagers be tempted by the chance of making money when the first Roman tenants move in? And what about the Gauls' secret weapon...

Rene Goscinny was born in Paris in 1926, and spent most of his childhood in Argentina, before eventually moving to Paris in 1951. He died in 1977. Albert Uderzo was born in 1927 in a small village in Marne, France. He met Rene Goscinny in 1951 and on 29 October 1959 their most famous creation, Asterix, made his first appearance on page...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:48 pages, 11.5 × 8.5 × 0.25 inPublished:October 28, 2004Publisher:Hachette Children'sLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0752866397

ISBN - 13:9780752866390

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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A cartoon drawn with such supreme artistry, and a text layered with such glorious wordplay, satire and historical and political allusion that no reader should ever feel like they've outgrown it.-TIME OUT